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Canadian Disaster Database

Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Lethbridge and Coalhurst AB Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: September 10, 2012 Evacuated: 3000
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown Normalized Total Cost (2011): Unknown
Comments Lethbridge and Coalhurst AB, September 10-11, 2012. Two large grass fires prompted local states of emergency and evacuations in southern Alberta. The first fire originated in the Blood Reserve near Coalhurst and Lethbridge. Approximately 2,200 residents in Coalhurst as well as residents in a Lethbridge trailer park were evacuated and sent to safe zones in Lethbridge. A second grass fire burned near the town of Milk River were approximately 800 people were evacuated to the nearby town of Raymond. Both grass fires damaged several sheds and outbuildings and destroyed one house. There was also one fire related injury reported. Residents were allowed to return to their homes on September 10 in Coalhurst and September 11 in Lethbridge.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Mackenzie County AB Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 11, 2012 Evacuated: 300
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown Normalized Total Cost (2011): Unknown
Comments Mackenzie County AB, July 11-20, 2012. As many as 11 wildfires burned out of control in Mackenzie County in northwestern Alberta, leading to two community evacuations. All Zama residents, including work camps were evacuated under a mandatory evacuation order on Tuesday, July 10 until July 20. The Zama access road was closed and a controlled barricade was set up at the Assumption Bypass/Apache Road into Zama to ensure that only authorized personnel were allowed access. A reception centre for evacuees was set up in the town hall of High Level. There were approximately 300 evacuees, including 134 from Zama and 164 from the Dene Tha? First Nation. The evacuation order was lifted July 17. Firefighters from Yukon, New Brunswick, Ontario, Alaska, and Mexico, along with helicopters and other equipment, joined over 300 firefighters already taking shifts to battle the fires in northern Alberta. Alberta?s Environment and Sustainable Resource Development (ESRD) provided sprinkling protection systems for all north end homes with additional sprinkling systems having been ordered to protect the homes located in the Zama interior. A sprinkling system for the fireguard along the containment line was also provided by ESRD. On July 17, Alberta Health Services issued an air quality advisory for residents in the La Crete area with respiratory concerns, advising them to visit the advanced ambulatory care centre located in the La Crete Community Health Centre. The advisory was lifted July 23.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Eckville, Lacombe, Paddle River, Fort Vermilion, and Peace River AB Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 12, 2011 Evacuated: 156
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown Normalized Total Cost (2011): Unknown
Comments Eckville, Paddle River, Fort Vermilion, and Peace River AB, July 12-14, 2011. According to the AB River Forecast Centre, water levels on the Peace River exceed 1 in 100 year event levels near Fort Vermilion. The region was divided into three segments to facilitate emergency response. All of 'Area A' included all of the low-lying areas, and was placed under immediate evacuation order. On July 12, there were approximately 100 flooded homes in Eckville and 700 homes were without electricity or phone services. Roads and highways were significantly damaged.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Calgary AB Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 29, 2011 Evacuated: 141
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown Normalized Total Cost (2011): Unknown
Comments Calgary AB, May 29-31, 2011. Tsuu T?ina First Nation evacuated approximately 40 families (120 individuals) from Calgary due to flooding and road washouts. In addition, The Stone Tribe evacuated approxiamtely seven families (21 individuals) due to flooding. Also, the Siksika First Nation and Town of High River have issued voluntary evacuation orders for Hidden Valley and High River areas.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Slave Lake AB Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 15, 2011 Evacuated: 12055
Estimated Total Cost: $581,099,000 Normalized Total Cost (2011): $581,099,000
Comments Slave Lake AB, May 15 to May 22, 2011. Fortynine wildfires in north-central Alberta burned across the Lesser Slave River Region, prompting one of the most destructive wildfires in Canadian history. A state of emergency was declared by the Municipal District of Lesser Slave River No. 124 on May 15, after a wildfire that originated in the town of Slave Lake began to spread uncontrollably, affecting surrounding communities. The wildfire devastated the town of Slave Lake, where 374 buildings were destroyed and 52 damaged by the flames. Approximately 7000 people were evacuated from the town of Slave Lake and 735 individuals and families lost their homes. Outside of the town of Slave Lake, 59 other buildings were destroyed and 32 were damaged. Other affected communities include High Prairie, Little Buffalo, Red Earth Creek, Loon Lake First Nation (FN), Whitefish Lake FN and Woodland Cree FN. Penn West Petroleum, Exall Energy Corp. and Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. halted drilling in the region, suspended production and evacuated their employees. Canadian National (CN) Railway also halted their services in the region. By May 19, the number of evacuees rose to approximately 12,055. The total cost in damages was estimated at over $500 million.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storm - Unspecified / Other Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Calgary AB Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 12, 2010 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $400,000,000 Normalized Total Cost (2011): $411,673,820
Comments Calgary AB, July 12, 2010. A massive 30-minute long hailstorm pelted the city of Calgary on July 12. The hail ranged from 4 cm in diameter to baseball-sized hail balls. Apart from the hail, the storm brought along with it heavy rain, strong wind gusts, thunder and lightning. The storm caused severe damages throughout the city as hail broke windows, dented cars and destroyed crops. The hailstorm decimated over 90,000 hectares of cropland near Strathmore and Hussar. Crop damage claims were estimated at $18.5 million. In total, the estimated dollar value of damage claims was over $400 million, making it the costliest hailstorm in Canada to date.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southern Alberta and Saskatchewan Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: June 17, 2010 Evacuated: 2065
Estimated Total Cost: $1,031,670,000 Normalized Total Cost (2011): $1,061,778,824
Comments Southern Alberta and Saskatchewan, June 17, 2010. Record rainfall resulted in extensive flooding in Alberta and Saskatchewan, washing out a portion of the Trans-Canada highway and shutting down part of the Canadian Pacific rail line. Fourty people from the Blood Tribe reserve, 75 homes in Maple Creek, and 600 households in Medicine Hat were forced to evacuate. Disaster financial assistance was provided by both provinces.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: County of Thorhild AB Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 12, 2010 Evacuated: 300
Estimated Total Cost: $10,000,000 Normalized Total Cost (2011): $10,291,846
Comments County of Thorhild AB, May 12, 2010. A wildfire in the county of Thorhild, north of Edmonton, affected thousands of acres of land. The community of Opal experienced numerous evacuation orders, which affected up to 100 homes on May 17. The Province of Alberta provided $10 million in funding under the Municipal Wildfire Assistance Program to aid in the community's recovery.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: 2
Place: Southern Alberta Injured / Infected: 77
Event Date: August 1, 2009 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown Normalized Total Cost (2011): Unknown
Comments Southern Alberta, August 1-3, 2009. A cold front swept through southern Alberta on August 1, bringing with it strong wind gusts of up to 100 km/h. The powerful winds brought down a stage at the Big Valley Jamboree in Camrose killing one individual and injuring 75 others. Calgary received wind gusts of up to 78 km/h. The strong winds killed a small child and injured two others when debris from a construction site struck the individuals. On August 2 and 3, a powerful storm developed increasing the severity of the strong winds with wind gusts of up to 107 km/h, along with large hail and heavy rain. The power winds downed trees and power lines, knocking out power to an unknown number of people. In some parts of Alberta, hail was measured at 10 cm deep, with some hail the size of baseballs. Hail caused extensive damages to homes and vehicles.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Edmonton AB Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 18, 2009 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $4,500,000 Normalized Total Cost (2011): $4,716,346
Comments Edmonton AB, July 18, 2009. A cold front mixed with warm air produced severe thunderstorms in the Edmonton area. The city of Edmonton, along with Lamont and Strathcona counties, were hit by a storm cell that produced intense lightning, heavy rain, hail and strong winds of up to 110 km/h. The strong winds downed trees and power lines, knocking out power to an unknown number of people. In Edmonton, the powerful winds ripped the awning off the Edmonton CN Tower, causing damages to the tower and vehicles parked below. In addition, lightning caused various fires throughout the city.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Drought Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Saskatchewan and Alberta Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: March 1, 2009 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown Normalized Total Cost (2011): Unknown
Comments Saskatchewan and Alberta, March 1 to July 1, 2009. The Canadian Wheat Board projected lower crop prospects by 20 per cent across the Prairies. A dozen counties and municipal districts in Alberta declared a state of drought emergency or disaster. For example, Saskatoon had less than one-quarter of the usual amount of spring precipitation, making the months of March, April and May the driest since record-keeping began in 1892. It wasn't just spring that was dry. The soil moisture recharge period between September 1, 2008 and March 31, 2009 had less than 60 per cent of normal precipitation. To the west, in Alberta, conditions were even drier, as illustrated by precipitation amounts in Edmonton, where the 12- month total rain and snow from July 2008 to June 2009 was only 234 mm, less than half of normal and the driest such period with records dating back to 1880. Making matters worse, eight of the last ten years in Alberta's capital of Edmonton had less rain and snow than the 30-year average total, but no year was as scanty as the most recent. Not surprisingly, the flow of the North Saskatchewan River was at its third lowest level in nearly a century.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Lethbridge AB Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 1, 2008 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown Normalized Total Cost (2011): Unknown
Comments Lethbridge AB, July 1, 2008. On Canada Day 2008, Lethbridge was hit by an intense storm that brought heavy rain, which caused flash flooding in parts of the city. It rained 47 mm, the monthly average in just about 90 minutes. The heavy rain reached a peak of about 200 mm for at least one hour. The intense rainstorm flooded the basements of over 300 houses, submerged three underpasses and caused road closures, including the closure of one bridge.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: High River AB Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 24, 2008 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown Normalized Total Cost (2011): Unknown
Comments High River AB, May 24, 2008. Surging water levels on the Highwood River forced the town of High River to declare a state of local emergency.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southwest Alberta Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 21, 2008 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $7,535,000 Normalized Total Cost (2011): $7,918,024
Comments Southwest Alberta, May 21-25, 2008. A series of rainstorms and the resulting high stream flows significantly impacted municipalities in Southwestern Alberta. The Government of Alberta established a Disaster Recovery Program on July 30, 2008, covering all affected municipalities and residents. The program includes the municipalities of Black Diamond, High River, Okotoks, Clagary, Municipal Districts of Foothills, Kananaskis Improvement District, Pincher Creek, Rocky View, and the Stony First Nation.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Newbrook AB Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 16, 2008 Evacuated: 150
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown Normalized Total Cost (2011): Unknown
Comments Newbrook AB, May 16-19, 2008. A wildfire burning near the community of Newbrook forced the evacuation of approximately 150 people. A team of 115 firefighters aided by 40 firefighters from British Columbia, halted the fire from reaching Newbrook by bulldozing a strip of timber in between the town and the fire, which prevented the fire from spreading. The fire reached a maximum size of 1,950 hectares. Two houses were destroyed by the blaze.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Calgary, Edmonton, St. Albert, the town of Stony Plain, Parkland County, Two Hills County, Kneehill County, Camrose, and the municipal districts of Rocky View and Bighorn AB Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: June 5, 2007 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $16,396,213 Normalized Total Cost (2011): $17,631,443
Comments Calgary, Edmonton, St. Albert, the town of Stony Plain, Parkland County, Two Hills County, Kneehill County, Camrose, and the municipal districts of Rocky View and Bighorn AB, June 5, 2007. A severe rainstorm on June 5 affected the cities of Calgary, Edmonton, and St. Albert, the town of Stony Plain, Parkland County, the County of Two Hills, Kneehill County, Camrose, County , and the Municipal Districts of Rocky View and Bighorn. Many residences and small businesses experienced flooding resulting in loss of contents and structural damage. Infrastructure damage to municipal roads and storm sewer lines, and provincial parks also occurred.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Nordegg AB Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 4, 2006 Evacuated: 130
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown Normalized Total Cost (2011): Unknown
Comments Nordegg AB, July 4-7, 2006. A wildfire that burned two kilometres away from the village of Nordegg, located 200 kilometres West of Red Deer, forced the evacuation of 130 residents, including dozens of campers. The fire grew to be 126 hectares in size and was likely sparked by lighting. Residents returned home July 7.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: 2
Place: Southern Alberta Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: June 6, 2005 Evacuated: 7028
Estimated Total Cost: $129,049,397 Normalized Total Cost (2011): $144,607,689
Comments Southern Alberta, June 6-8, 2005. Heavy rainfall and high water levels across southern Alberta caused massive flooding in several waterways. Multiple municipalities across the region issued a state of emergency. Severe flooding caused the evacuation of 2000 people in Calgary, 1,300 in Sundre, 3,200 in Drumheller, 200 in High River, 70 in Foothills, 58 in Okotoks and 200 in Red Deer County. Officials reported that the 200-year flood event resulted in significant damages to approximately 40,000 homes.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Grande Prairie AB Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 8, 2004 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown Normalized Total Cost (2011): Unknown
Comments Grande Prairie AB, July 8, 2004. A tornado swept through the city of Grand Prairie turning over cars and causing damages to homes and businesses. Environment Canada reported the tornado as a funnel cloud, although a tornado advisory was in place at the time. The tornado touched down at 15:30 MST and passed through the city?s downtown core. Damages included a downed power line that caused a small fire in a hotel, the destruction of a Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant as well as numerous homes with damaged roofs, doors and windows.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Edmonton AB Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 2, 2004 Evacuated: 30000
Estimated Total Cost: $12,678,824 Normalized Total Cost (2011): $14,519,494
Comments Edmonton AB, July 2-11, 2004. Severe hail and rain battered parts of Edmonton, causing extensive flooding of basements and streets, and forcing the evacuation of 30,000 people from the worlds largest shopping mall, the West Edmonton Mall.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southeastern British Columbia and Southwestern Alberta Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 1, 2003 Evacuated: 48501
Estimated Total Cost: $159,052,448 Normalized Total Cost (2011): $185,509,616
Comments Southeastern British Columbia and Southwestern Alberta; July and August 2003. Dozens of communities were evacuated due to wildfires started by lightning and careless fire use. Over 50,000 people were evacuated and firefighting costs alone are estimated at $400 million dollars.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Avalanche Fatalities: 30
Place: Western Canada Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 21, 2003 Evacuated: 2
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown Normalized Total Cost (2011): Unknown
Comments Golden, Fernie, Valemount, Nelson, Revelstoke, Durrand Glacier BC and Rogers Pass, Connaught Creek Valley, Okotoks, Mt. Terry Fox, Lake Louise, Rocky Mountains AB, January ? April 2003. Deadly avalanche season since 1970 claimed 30 lives in Western Canada. The higher death toll was in part due to unusual weather patterns brought by an El Nino winter.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Peerless Lake, Trout Lake AB Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: June 23, 2002 Evacuated: 600
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown Normalized Total Cost (2011): Unknown
Comments Peerless Lake and Trout Lake AB, June 23, 2002. The Peerless Lake Complex involved three separate fires within a small area approximately 155 km north of Slave Lake. These three fires forced the MD of Opportunity No. 17 to evacuate approximately 600 people to Red Earth. The wild fires consumed a total of 15,438 ha of forest.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southern Alberta Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: June 11, 2002 Evacuated: 350
Estimated Total Cost: $16,054,182 Normalized Total Cost (2011): $19,248,964
Comments Southern AB, June 11, 2002. Approximately 280 mm of rain fell on the area within a few days. The heavy rain and the unusually late spring runoff caused mudslides and forced sewage into river systems, and power lines were damaged in Waterton Lake National Park. A local state of emergency was declared for the areas of: Pincher Creek, County of Warner, Village of Sterling, Village of Warner, Village of Foremost, and the Town of Coaldale. Two hundred residents from the Blood First Nation and 150 residents from the Peigan First Nation were evacuated.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Northern Alberta and Conklin Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 17, 2002 Evacuated: 1254
Estimated Total Cost: $1,300,000 Normalized Total Cost (2011): $1,558,700
Comments Northern AB and Conklin, May 14 - June 7, 2002. The House River Fire was first spotted on May 17, 2002. It burned 248,243 hectares. The fire was approximately 100 km north of Lac La Biche. At its peak, 1,000 firefighters were on the fireline. The task was difficult given the strong and shifting winds and minimal precipitation. The fire perimeter was secured by June 7, 2002. This was Alberta's second largest forest fire since 1961. On May 27 the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo evacuated approximately 1,550 people. There were approximately 1,300 from work camps, and 250 from the community of Conklin. All individuals were allowed to return on June 8, 2002.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Drought Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Across Canada, concentrated in Saskatchewan and Alberta Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: June 1, 2001 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown Normalized Total Cost (2011): Unknown
Comments Across Canada, concentrated in Saskatchewan and Alberta, Spring 2001 to Fall 2002. A severe drought was felt across all Canada, affecting 41,000 people, with the most devastating impacts felt in Saskatchewan and Alberta. Record to near-record drought, as indicated by the Palmer Drought Severity Index, was recorded at several climate stations in 2001. The winter of 2001-2002 continued the dry trend and brought above normal temperatures. Fall 2002 brought much needed precipitation to relieve much of the drought, though dry conditions did remain in places. The repercussions of the drought included agricultural production, employment, crop and livestock production, and the Gross Domestic Product.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: 12
Place: Pine Lake AB Injured / Infected: 140
Event Date: July 14, 2000 Evacuated: 1000
Estimated Total Cost: $3,385,331 Normalized Total Cost (2011): $4,254,729
Comments Pine Lake AB, July 14, 2000. A tornado hit Pine Lake at 300 kilometres an hour, killing 12 people and injuring more than 140. Close to one-thousand people were displaced from a campsite as their recreational vehicles were damaged.