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Canadian Disaster Database

Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storm - Unspecified / Other Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Ontario, Quebec Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: November 15, 2020 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments On November 15th, a strong frontal system passed through Ontario and Quebec. The system brought an array of hazardous weather conditions: An EF1 tornado touched down near Georgetown; there were four confirmed downbursts events (Dunnville, New Dundee, Ingersoll, Port Burwell) with wind speeds ranging from 115-135 km/hr; strong winds across much of northeastern and southern Ontario (Port Colborne, for example, recorded maximum wind speeds of 132 km/hr with 10 consecutive hours of winds over 80 km/hr); and a significant seiche in Lake Erie (4 m sea level difference between Toledo, Ohio, and Buffalo, New York). As a result, this system generated widespread damage across Ontario and into Quebec - southwestern Ontario was the most impacted. By the early evening of November 15th, over 1 million individuals were without power in Ontario, Quebec, and the United States. Hydro One reported over 542,000 customers that were affected and over 500 downed hydro poles; power was still not fully restored to all customers by November 19th. Power outages were also reported in Quebec. This event is estimated to have cost $87 million (2020 CAD) in insured losses.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southern Ontairo and southern Quebec Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 10, 2020 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments On January 10th, a low pressure system moved through southern Ontario and Quebec which began with temperature highs of 10-12C and rain, before changing to freezing rain and snow by January 12th in some locations. Extensive amounts of precipitation fell across southern Ontario; 78.4 mm in Toronto, 76.1 mm in London and 65.5 mm in Peterborough. As a result of the frozen ground and rain, there was overland flooding and sewer backups in several regions. The passage of the cold front also brought high winds which in combination with freezing rain led to tree damage and power outages. The system also affected Quebec. Montreal, for example, recorded 60 mm of precipitation. The system caused an estimated $95.3 million in insured losses - $81.6 million in Ontario and $13.7 million in Quebec (CAD 2020).
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storm - Unspecified / Other Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Eastern Canada Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: October 31, 2019 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments For many communities across eastern Canada, there was an autumn storm forecast for Halloween night in 2019; 20 communities in Quebec postponed trick-or-treating festivities by one night. On Halloween night through to the morning of November 1st, the storm brought rain to the southern regions and snow to the northern regions of the affected area. However, it was the wind, and subsequent waves and storm surges along the shorelines of the Great Lakes that caused the most damage. Strong winds were recorded across eastern Canada (e.g. 129 km/hr in Port Colborne, ON, 107 km/hr in Montreal 102 km/hr in Halifax, and 100 km/hr in St. John's). There were also widespread power outages - 2 million in Quebec were without power. The storm caused over $255 million (CAD 2019) in insurable losses; $189 million in Quebec, $55 million in Ontario, $3 million in New Brunswick, $2 million in Nova Scotia, $480,000 in Newfoundland and Labrador, and $150,000 in PEI.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Pikangikum First Nation Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 30, 2019 Evacuated: 2500
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments In May of 2019, the Pikangikum First Nation was threatened by a large wildfire (Red Lake 14). The community declared a state of emergency, and the Canadian Armed Forces began evacuations of the community on May 30th using a CC-130 Hercules aircraft. Roughly, 2,500 residents were evacuated.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: 1
Place: Eastern Canada Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: April 18, 2019 Evacuated: 10000
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Extensive flooding in April and May was experienced across Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick due to a combination of heavy rainfalls and snow melt. In the Beauce region of Quebec, 154.5 mm of rain fell in April and was one of the first regions to be impacted by the spring floods. The most severe flooding took place in Quebec where there were over 10,000 evacuees and over 6,600 flooded homes. One person was killed in Pontiac, QC, after the road washed out. In Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac, a suburb of Montreal in the Deux-Montagnes MRC, a 15-23 m rupture in the natural dyke system forced the immediate evacuation of over 5,000 residents and 50 streets were flooded overnight on April 27-28th. Historical water levels were also experienced at the Chute-Bell hydro dam along Riviere Rouge where 50 residents of Grenville-sur-la-Rouge were evacuated due to fears of a dam failure. States of emergency extended across the 3 provinces, including in Ottawa and Montreal. By the end of April, over a dozen states of emergency had been declared along the Ottawa River and its tributaries alone. Around 2,000 Canadian Forces personnel were deployed, which was more than the number deployed overseas.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Kashechewan, Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: April 15, 2019 Evacuated: 2500
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Seasonal flooding along the Albany River forced the evacuation of Kashechewan First Nation, a community of 2,500, to various communities throughout Ontario including Timmins, Kapuskasing, Thunder Bay and Cornwall. The annual evacuation was moved ahead of schedule due to heavy snow.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Eastern Canada Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: March 14, 2019 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $124,000,000
Comments A significant low pressure system tracked through Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia between March 14th to 16th. The winter storm produced warm temperatures and rain which caused signifncant flooding in parts of Ontario such as Bolton and Caledon along the Humber River, and in Quebec. The storm moved through Quebec and into the Maritimes on the 15th and continued to bring rain and wind. It is estimated that the storm caused $124 million in insured losses ($63 million in Quebec, $53 million in Ontario, $6.6 million in Nova Scotia, and $1.8 million in New Brunswick).
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Eastern Canada Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 23, 2019 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $39,000,000
Comments From January 23rd to January 25th, 2019, a severe winter storm hit Quebec and the Maritime provinces. Over the course of the three days, heavy snowfall, freezing rain, and high winds caused over $39 million in damage, $26 million of which was in Quebec. The winter storm caused widespread school and flight cancellations, and power failures impacted 57,000 clients.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: Unknown
Place: National Capital Region Injured / Infected: 6
Event Date: September 21, 2018 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $334,000,000
Comments On September 21st, 6 tornadoes touched down in and near the National Capital Region. The strongest was an EF-3 that touched down near the City of Ottawa’s rural neighbourhoods of Kinburn and Dunrobin, and tracked almost 40 km across the Ottawa River into the lower Pontiac (Luskville) and the Mont Bleu neighbourhood of Gatineau between 4:40 pm and 5:20 pm. The estimated wind speeds were up to 265 km/hr. An EF-2 tornado, the second largest tornado of the outbreak, struck the Ottawa neighbourhoods of Arlington Woods and Craig Henry at around 6:00pm. The estimated wind speeds of this tornado was up to 220 km/hr. Four EF-1 tornadoes with wind speeds estimated between 138-177 km/hr touched down near Calabogie, ON; near the Baskatong Reservoir, QC, at around 3:30 pm (on the ground for 10 km); near Val-des-Bois, QC, at around 5:00pm (on the ground for 13 km); and near Otter Lake, QC, (on the ground for 3 km). In Quebec, the tornadoes caused $8.4 million in damages/losses to Hydro-Quebec. Extensive building damage was reported – almost 1,700 housing units were damaged in Gatineau, and 160 buildings with serious structural damage in the City of Ottawa, in addition to apartment complexes and commercial businesses in both affected areas. The tornado outbreak caused $334 million in insured damage, with at least $192 million in eastern Ontario and $102 million in the Gatineau Region.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Toronto Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: August 7, 2018 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $80,000,000
Comments A severe overnight storm produced over 70 mm of rain in Toronto; some localized rainfall measured over 120 mm. The rainfall amounts ranged from +100 mm in North York and the downtown area to only 6 mm at Pearson International Airport. Several people had to be rescued from their vehicles due to the urban flooding. Flooding or flood-related water was also reported in Toronto City Hall, Scotiabank Arena, Rogers Centre, and Union Station. This overnight urban flooding event caused over $80 million in insured losses.
Event Type: Terrorist | Shootings Fatalities: 3
Place: Toronto Injured / Infected: 13
Event Date: July 22, 2018 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Mass shooting in Toronto's Greektown neighborhood. Three people were killed, including the perpetrator, and 13 were injured.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 3, 2018 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments 2018 was an exceptionally busy fire season in Ontario with nearly twice as many fires and more than double the burned area than the 10-year average. At the end of the season, there was a reported 1,325 fires that burned over 275,000 ha of land. In July alone, 549 fires were recorded. Over 900 out-of-province personnel were brought in from 9 provinces and territories, the United States and Mexico. Some of the most notable fires were: Nipigon 30 which was the largest fire and burned almost 33,000 ha; and both Parry Sound 33 and the Temagami fire cluster led to multiple evacuation orders of communities, the closure of provincial parks, and air quality advisories.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storm - Unspecified / Other Fatalities: 3
Place: Southern Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 4, 2018 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $680,000,000
Comments On May 4th, the Highway 401 corridor through southern Ontario and southern Quebec experienced a fast-moving squall line with wind gusts of over 100 km/hr. Wind speeds of 126 km/hr were recorded in Hamilton and 117 km/hr in Montreal. The windstorm caused widespread power outages, roof damage and downed trees. Over 925,000 customers across Ontario and Quebec were without power; some were without power until May 9. The windstorm caused a total of $680 million in insured losses, with at least $380 million in Ontario alone. This event is noted to be the most costly disaster in Ontario since the 2013 Toronto flood.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Kashechewan First Nation, Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: April 25, 2018 Evacuated: 1672
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments In the spring of 2018, annual ice break up and flooding threatened the Kashechewan First Nation, and after declarations of an emergency, the Canadian Armed Forces were requested to assist in the evacuations and monitoring the water levels. Roughly 1,672 residents were evacuated to six host communities; the Red Cross also assisted municipal efforts.
Event Type: Terrorist | Kidnapping / Murder Fatalities: 10
Place: Toronto, ON Injured / Infected: 16
Event Date: April 23, 2018 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Vehicle-ramming attack. The perpetrator drove a rented van on the sidewalk along Yonge Street between Finch and Sheppard Avenues, hitting pedestrians. 10 people were killed and 16 injured.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southern Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: April 14, 2018 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $190,000,000
Comments A large winter storm with high winds, heavy snow and ice accumulation affected parts of southern Ontario and southern Quebec. Billy Bishop Airport on Toronto Island reported winds of 96 km/hr, while Wiarton Airport reported 40 cm of snow, and London International Airport received 14 hours of freezing rain and ice pellets. Several large buildings were damaged when sheets of ice fell from neighbouring buildings – Parliament building windows were broken in Ottawa, and falling ice from the CN tower pierced the Rogers Centre Dome. Roughly 1,800 car accidents were reported including a 50-car pileup on Highway 400 near Barrie. There were over 15,000 insurance claims and $190 million in insured losses.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southern Ontario and southern Quebec Injured / Infected: 1
Event Date: April 3, 2018 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments On April 3rd, a weather system began to move into Ontario beginning with wind and snow in Northern Ontario. On April 4th, the system moved through southern Ontario with rain, freezing rain and strong winds. Toronto and Hamilton, for example, both experienced winds of 98 km/hr. As a result, there were power outages and widespread wind damage across southern Ontario and parts of Quebec. A falling branch injured an individual in Belleville. There were also several car accidents including a 50-car pileup on Highway 400 near Barrie. The insurable losses were estimated to be over $102 million (2018 CAD).
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: 1
Place: Grand River, ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: February 16, 2018 Evacuated: 4900
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments The winter of 2018 was one of the coldest on record, which created a very strong icepack throughout the Grand River watershed in Ontario. In addition to this, temperature drops led to the formation of frazil ice – heavy slush in rivers. On February 19th, 40-60 mm of rain fell. The combination of frazil ice, ice jams, 40-60 mm of rain, and 50-70mm of melting snowpack caused the water levels of the Grand River to rise rapidly. Ice jams tended to form in Cambridge, Brantford and Cayuga – in Cambridge the ice jam measured 5 km upstream. The Grand River Conservation Authority issued flood warnings for several communities including Brantford, Cambridge, North Dumfries and Brant County. The first warning was issued on February 16th but by February 18th a warning was issued for the entire watershed. Up to 2,200 homes and 4,900 residents were impacted by an evacuation order. In Cambridge, ice and debris damaged city infrastructure, communications and a water main. The City of Brantford declared a State of Emergency. Along the Grand River near Orangeville, a young boy drowned in the floodwaters.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storm - Unspecified / Other Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Eastern Ontario, Western Quebec Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: October 28, 2017 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments A few weather systems combined to create a significant low pressure system that moved over eastern Ontario as well as western and southern Quebec. From 3:00pm on October 28th to 1:00pm on October 30th, 112.5 mm of rain fell over Ottawa. As a result, there was significant pluvial/urban flooding within Ottawa and road washouts in western Quebec. Insurable losses were estimated to be $99.8 million (2017 CAD).
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Windsor, Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: August 28, 2017 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $173,000,000
Comments Rain began to fall on August 28th and within 48 hours – 222 mm fell southwest of Windsor, 140-200 mm in Riverside-Tecumseh, and 285 mm in Lasalle. This rain and flood event occurred less than a year after another record setting event in September of 2016. There were almost 2,700 flood-related calls to Windsor’s 311 line. Several public facilities and businesses were also impacted including schools and libraries. Thousands of basements were flooded which resulted in over $173 million in insurance payouts.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: 2
Place: Eastern Canada Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 4, 2017 Evacuated: 4000
Estimated Total Cost: $116,000,000
Comments A combination of significant rainfall from May 4-7, overland flow, and high water levels led to extensive flooding across in parts of eastern Canada. Montreal and the National Capital Region experienced their wettest springs in recorded history with over +400 mm of rainfall. Several communities declared States of Emergency including Gatineau, Montreal, and many smaller towns. The Canadian military deployed 4,000 personnel to help with the flood efforts. The event caused significant losses including over $116 million in insured damage, and 550 damaged roads. Two people were killed in floodwaters in the Sainte-Anne River (Gaspe region).
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Kashechewan First Nation, Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: April 16, 2017 Evacuated: 500
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments In the spring of 2017, the rising water levels of the Albany River was threatening the Kashechewan First Nation. After declaring a state of emergency, roughly 500 residents were evacuated as a precaution. The Canadian Armed Forces aided in the evacuations as well as monitoring the river levels.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storm - Unspecified / Other Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southwestern Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: March 8, 2017 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments On March 8th, a weather system with significant winds tracked over southern Ontario. Winds recorded in Windsor were 111 km/hr and 115 km/hr in Hamilton. As a result, there was widespread wind damage, bridge closures, and power outages. The insurable losses were estimated to be $110.9 million (2017 CAD).
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Windsor and Tecumseh ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: September 29, 2016 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Windsor and Tecumsech ON, September 29, 2016. States of emergency were declared in Windsor and Tecumsech after the region was hit with intense storms that produced significant flooding. The Windsor Airport recorded 78 mm of rain within a 24-hour period, while another gauge in the city’s east end measured 106 mm and the town of Tecumsech received up to 190 mm. In both municipalities, the heavy rain resulted in hundreds of flooded basements. Cars were abandoned in flooded streets and many roads were closed.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southern Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 8, 2016 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $47,063,000
Comments Southern Ontario, July 8, 2016. A cold front produced severe thunderstorms across southern Ontario. Multiple severe storms caused hail to fall in Markdale and Flesherton before moving east into Midland and Bradford. Heavy rain, strong winds and lighting were experienced in London, Whitby and Ajax, where it rained over 35 mm. Strong wind gusts of over 100 km/h were reported in areas north of the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). The strong winds downed trees and power lines resulting in power outages that affected over 39,000 Hydro One customers (approximately 117,000 individuals). Additionally, hail caused significant crop damage to over 2000 acres of crop land in the Holland Marsh area.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Kenora ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: June 27, 2016 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Kenora ON, June 27-28, 2016. Two states of emergency were declared in Kenora due to flooding that resulted in over 20 roads experiencing moderate to extensive damages. On June 27, the first state of emergency was declared after Kenora received more than 109 mm of rain over a two-day period. The main road into the city, Veterans Drive, was completely washed out and subsequently closed. A second state of emergency was declared on June 28.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Kashechewan First Nation ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: April 27, 2016 Evacuated: 1207
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Kashechewan First Nation ON, April 27-30, 2016. The chief of Kashechewan First Nation declared a state of emergency on April 27 due to annual spring ice break up, snowmelt and subsequent run off in the James Bay coast. In total, 1,207 residents out of the 1,600 residents who live in the northern Ontario reserve evacuated their homes in multiple stages of evacuations that took place from April 29-30. Evacuees were taken to Kapuskasing and Thunder bay.
Event Type: Fire | Residential Fatalities: 9
Place: Pikangikum First Nation ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: March 29, 2016 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Pikangikum First Nation ON, March 29, 2016. A residential fire in the remote northwestern Ontario community of Pikangikum First Nation, killed a total of nine people. All of the victims were family members and died from smoke inhalation. A five month old baby, a two year old and a four year old were the youngest of the victims. The cause of the fire is unknown.
Event Type: Geological | Landslide Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Horton ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: March 28, 2016 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Horton ON, March 28-29, 2016. A 10 hectare landslide in the township of Horton slid into the Bonnechere River near Renfrew Ontario. The landslide congested the river with trees and debris causing a blockage, which resulted in flooding of up to seven metres. The flood water destroyed a cottage and a hunting camp as well as caused damage to the Renfrew Sewage Plant and Hydroelectric Plant.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southern Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: March 23, 2016 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $27,379,000
Comments Southern Ontario, March 23-26, 2016. A warm front over southern Ontario caused snow, rain and freezing rain to fall over a three-day period. The wet weather began as snow for many regions in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), and then briefly turned into rain before freezing rain occurred overnight. On March 24, freezing rain impacted regions west of Toronto and the GTA. Highly elevated areas including the Niagara escarpment, Dundalk Highlands and parts of the GTA received 24 hours of freezing rain. Freezing rain occurred throughout southern Ontario until March 26, leaving several communities with significant ice accumulation including 35 mm in Fergus, 33 mm in Orangeville, 20 mm Brampton and Newmarket as well as 10 mm north of Barrie and Toronto. The freezing rain caused damages to personal property and municipal infrastructure due to the significant ice buildup. Downed trees destroyed power lines and caused damages to homes, outbuildings and vehicles. Approximately 100,000 hydro customers (300,000 individuals) were without power during the storm. Additionally, the storm caused the cancelation of in-going and out-going flights at the Toronto Pearson International Airport and Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport as well as resulted in the closure and cancelation of schools and municipal busses.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nove Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: February 24, 2016 Evacuated: 200
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nove Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland, February 24-26, 2016. A storm system tracked its way northeast into the Great Lakes from the United States in late February. The system moved towards eastern Canada, causing widespread damages to Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland. On February 24, freezing rain caused up to 25 mm of ice accumulation to build in parts of Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick. On February 25, Quebec and New Brunswick experienced several hours of continued freezing rain. Heavy rain and thunderstorms trailed behind the freezing rain resulting in total rainfalls of 51 mm in Hamilton, Ontario, 36 mm in Lennoxville, Quebec and 68 mm in Gray River, Newfoundland. A combination of rain and mild weather that melted ice and snow resulted in localized flooding for numerous communities. Flooded basements were reported in Cornwall, Ontario, multiple underpasses were closed due to flooding in Montreal, Quebec, while local fire departments in northern New Brunswick warned drivers of poor road conditions due to ice ruts and isolated flooding. Multiple local states of emergency were declared in the Eastern Townships of Quebec where ice breakup resulted in the flooding of local rivers. Approximately 200 residents were evacuated and over 50 homes in Beauceville, Quebec were damaged by floodwaters. Fallen trees weighed down by the heavy ice and snow damaged power lines resulting in widespread power outages. Quebec was hit the hardest with over 250,000 hydro customers (approximately 750,000 individuals) affected by the power outages.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southern Ontario Injured / Infected: 6
Event Date: August 2, 2015 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Southern Ontario, August 2-3, 2015. Southern Ontario was struck by three confirmed tornados, two EF2 tornadoes and an EF1 tornado, along with an EF1 downburst and one other unconfirmed tornado sighting. An EF2 tornado touched down in the small town of Teviotdale located 60 kilometres north of Waterloo and another touched down in Lebanon. Wind gusts were reported between 180 to 220 km/h in some areas. The tornado that struck Lebanon caused only minimal damages, however the tornado in Teviotdale left a nine kilometre trail of damage, which downed power lines, destroyed two homes and damaged several other homes and vehicles. The EF1 tornado in Marsville also caused only minimal damages, mostly to trees. In addition, there was a confirmed EF1 downburst in Utica that caused damages to a local Green Tractors John Deere Dealership as well as an unconfirmed tornado in Proton Station that collapsed a tent sending six people to the hospital. Approximately 50,000 hydro customers (150,000 individuals) in southwest Ontario were left without power due to the severe supercell system that caused the tornadoes to form. Residents in several communities throughout southern Ontario experienced strong winds, rain and hail after the tornadoes touched down as a second system moved into the region later in the evening.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southern Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: June 22, 2015 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $29,188,000
Comments Southern Ontario, June 22-23, 2015. A cold front that swept through southern Ontario after a warm low pressure system created severe isolated thunderstorms that brought intense lightening, heavy rain and strong winds. Heavy rainfall caused flooding in London, where there was up to 48 mm of rain and in Toronto, where the Toronto Pearson International Airport recorded 110 mm. Flooding in London overwhelmed the sewage system as well as caused damages to residential and commercial properties due to basement flooding. In Toronto, flooding caused road closures and delayed Go Transit. Strong winds and lighting downed trees, which caused damages to homes and power lines. Approximately 100,000 Hydro One customers (300,000 individuals) were without power during the storm.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Fort Albany and Kashcewan First Nation Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: April 17, 2015 Evacuated: 1333
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Fort Albany and Kashechewan First Nation ON, April 17 to May 11, 2015. The annual spring melt resulted in high water levels in the Albany River, which caused severe flooding for communities in the James Bay region. A state of emergency was declared on April 17, for the Kashechewan First Nation, which is situated in the mouth of the Albany River on the shores of James Bay. The community of Fort Albany also declared a state of emergency on April 29. Evacuations in Kashechewan began April 25, where 1,320 residents were air lifted to safety. In Fort Albany, 13 hospital patients were also evacuated by air. On April 27, the Ontario government issued a Request for Federal Assistance (RFA) for aircrafts in response to the flood in order to evacuate the remaining residents. The community of Moose Cree First Nation was also affected but no evacuations took place. In total, 1,333 people were evacuated to Kapuskasing, Smooth Rock Falls, Wawa and Cornwall. Some residents were permanently displaced due to mold and poor living conditions brought on by the reoccurring floods. Evacuation efforts were complete by April 28.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Rail Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Gogama and Mattagami First Nation ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: March 7, 2015 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Gogama and Mattagami First Nation ON, March 7-9, 2015. A CN Rail train carrying crude oil was derailed near the town of Gogoma in northern Ontario. In total, 30 out of the 94 tanker cars were derailed and caught fire. About one million gallons of petroleum product spilled during the incident, 21 cars sustained mild to severe damages and about 900 feet of track was destroyed. Some of the derailed tanker cars leaked crude oil into the Makami River, causing officials to issue a water advisory warning for the Mattagami First Nation community. Residents of Gogoma and Mattagami First Nation were advised to stay indoors for risk of smoke inhalation.
Event Type: Terrorist | Shootings Fatalities: 2
Place: Ottawa ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: October 22, 2014 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Ottawa ON, Oct 22, 2014. At approximately 09:52 EDT, an armed gunman pulled up in their vehicle to the Ottawa National War Memorial where three Canadian Armed Forces members were posted on Ceremonial Guard sentry duty. The assailant shot at Cpl. Nathan Cirillo striking him twice in the back and fatally wounding him. The assailant then fired at the other sentries as they fled towards the Parliament buildings; but neither of the other sentries were struck or injured. Pulling up to Parliament Hill, the assailant ran from their car and carjacked an idling Parliamentary vehicle on the hill. Members of the RCMP began pursuit as he pulled the vehicle up and ran into the front doors of Parliament. Upon entering, the assailant engaged in a struggle with House of Commons Security Guard Samearn Son, who was shot in the foot in the ensuing struggle. The assailant fled further into the Parliament buildings and was fatally shot by the Sergeant-at-Arms of the House of Commons, Kevin Vickers. In the ensuing search for additional shooters, many federal government buildings and offices were placed in lockdown. Public institutions such as the University of Ottawa and nearby schools were also placed in lockdown. There were false reports that a third shooting had taken place at the Rideau Centre Mall, fueled by high cellular phone and social media usage that also strained cell towers and communications infrastructure. Government employees were asked to restrict their Blackberry usage for emergencies only until the crisis was over to reduce burden on the system. The following day, Prime Minister Stephen Harper classified the attack as terrorism.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Angus, Ontario Injured / Infected: 3
Event Date: June 17, 2014 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments On June 17th, an EF2 tornado struck Angus, ON, a community 18 km southwest of Barrie. At 5:00pm (local), a line of severe thunderstorms moved into the region and within 15 minutes, the tornado tracked through the community of Angus. The tornado was on the ground for 20 km and damaged 102 homes, 14 of which were beyond repair. The tornado left 300 individuals homeless, caused 3 minor injuries and over $50 million (CAD 2014) in insured losses. A state of emergency was in place for a week.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: James Bay, Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 7, 2014 Evacuated: 2000
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments In the spring of 2014, the ice breakup and flooding along the southwestern shorelines of James Bay and its tributary rivers were threatening several communities. On May 7th, the Canadian Armed Forces began to assist in the evacuation of communities in the James Bay region including Kashechewan, Fort Albany, and Attawapiskat. Evacuation operations continued in the region for almost two weeks. As a result of flooding and sewer back-ups, 40 buildings were damaged. Roughly 2,000 residents in several communities were evacuated.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: 2
Place: Southern Ontario Injured / Infected: 25
Event Date: December 21, 2013 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $262,781,642
Comments Southern Ontario, ON, December 21, 2013 to January 1, 2014. A severe storm brought freezing rain and damaging ice accumulation across a large area of southern Ontario. According to Environment Canada, the epicentre of the freezing rain was in southern Ontario along the north shore of Lake Ontario, including the Greater Toronto Area, where ice accumulation reached up to 30 mm. The impact of the ice storm on these municipalities and conservation authorities was further exacerbated by freezing temperatures. The ice storm had serious impacts. In its aftermath, as many as 830,000 hydro customers (2,490,000 individuals) across Southern Ontario were without power for several days. Downed trees, broken branches, and downed wires resulting from ice accumulation posed serious public health and safety risks, as well as transportation network problems. Due to widespread power outages and freezing temperatures, municipalities activated emergency plans to open warming centres and canvassed homes of vulnerable residents to ensure their safety. Power was restored to most residences and businesses by January 1, 2014. Response and recovery activities began at the time of the event. The ice storm significantly impacted some of Canada’s largest and most densely populated urban municipalities. Municipalities, provincial ministries and non-governmental organizations such as the Red Cross all acted to respond to the ice storm. Ontario determined that the impacts of the storm were severe enough to warrant implementation of an Ice Storm Assistance Program to help municipalities and conservation authorities with emergency response and recovery costs. Two deaths were attributed to the storm due to carbon monoxide poisoning from improperly ventilated generators and heaters. *Note: A request for federal assistance through the DFAA program has been made; however, no payments have yet been issued.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Vehicle Fatalities: 9
Place: Ottawa, Ontario Injured / Infected: 34
Event Date: September 18, 2013 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments On September 18th, at 8:32am (local) during the morning rush hour in Ottawa, a VIA rail passenger train struck an OC Transpo (city transit) double decker bus at a crossing. As a result of the collision, the front of the bus was sheared off and the train was derailed. On the bus, there were 9 fatalities, 9 serious injuries, and roughly 25 minor injuries.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: 1
Place: Southern Ontario and southern Quebec Injured / Infected: 10
Event Date: July 19, 2013 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments A series of severe thunderstorms tracked over southern Ontario and Quebec throughout July 19th and into the next morning. The storm brought exceptionally strong winds. Pearson International Airport in Toronto, for example, recorded winds of 104 km/hr. As a result, there was widespread wind damage and power outages. One individual was killed by a falling tree branch and two others were injured in Boucherville, QC; 8 children were also injured when their tent collapsed in Prevost, QC. Insurable losses were estimated to be $167 million (CAD 2013).
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Toronto ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 8, 2013 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $940,000,000
Comments Toronto ON, July 8, 2013. A thunderstorm that produced 126 mm in precipitation caused flash-flooding in the Greater Toronto area. The flooding closed multiple transportation corridors, caused wide-spread property damage, and disrupted power to approximately 300,000 residents. The Insurance Bureau of Canada estimated that the flooding caused $940 million in insured property damage.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Kasabonika Lake First Nation ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 27, 2013 Evacuated: 150
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Kasabonika Lake First Nation ON, May 27-31, 2013. Snow and ice melt caused water levels to rise rapidly on Kasabonika Lake, threatening the First Nations community that lives on the lake. A local state of emergency was declared and approximately 150 of the most vulnerable residents were evacuated to the towns of Hearst and Greenstone. Several buildings were damaged in the flood. As water levels returned to normal, residents were allowed to return to their homes by May 31.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Sandy Lake First Nation ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 31, 2012 Evacuated: 637
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Sandy Lake ON, July 31 to August 6, 2012. The Sandy Lake First Nation declared a state of emergency due to the risk of smoke from wildfiresfires in northern Ontario. A total of 637 residents were evacuated to Thunder Bay and Fort Frances. Evacuees began returning to their homes on August 5, with the remaining evacuees allowed to return home on August 6.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southern Ontario and southern Quebec Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 22, 2012 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments In the late afternoon of July 22nd, a series of thunderstorms tracked over parts of southwestern Ontario. In Hamilton, 66mm of rain fell in a matter of a few hours; an unofficial gauge recorded 140 mm. The storms continued into eastern Ontario the next day. Strong winds were recorded in the Lake Nipissing area, up the Ottawa River Valley and into Quebec. Straight line winds, golf-ball-sized hail, were heavy localized rain were reported in both Ontario and Quebec. The system caused $92.6 million (CAD 2012) in insurable losses.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Thunder Bay ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 28, 2012 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $241,589,000
Comments Thunder Bay ON, May 28, 2012. Heavy rain and subsequent flooding caused the city of Thunder Bay in northwestern Ontario to declare a state of emergency. Nearly 100 mm of rain was recorded at some weather stations in Thunder Bay on May 28. The flooding caused road closures, damages to thousands of homes, and interfered with utility services. Thunder Bay Hydro cut power to 50 customers (approximately 1,500 individuals) as a precaution to prevent electrical fires in severely flooded areas.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Timmins ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 24, 2012 Evacuated: 1000
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Timmins ON, May 24 to June 07, 2012. A state of emergency was declared when smoke from a wildfire approximately 70 kilometers wide threatened communities in and around Timmins, Ontario. Approximately 1000 residents from the region were evacuated as a precaution. The fire forced the temporary closure of some mining operations. On June 7, the fire was contained and residents were able to return home.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Kirkland Lake ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 20, 2012 Evacuated: 300
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Kirkland Lake ON, May 20-29, 2012. A wildfire near the town of Kirkland Lake forced the evacuation of approximately 300 people and caused the town to declare a state of emergency. Damage from the fire included a power line and an undetermined number of cabins in the Young Lake and Amikougami Lake area. Power outages affected local mining operations. All evacuated permanent residents returned to their homes on May 27. The Ontario Provincial Police reported that the fire originated from a campfire on the east side of Elsie Lake.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Fort Albany and Kashechewan First Nations ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: March 24, 2012 Evacuated: 269
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Kashechewan and Fort Albany ON, March 24 to April 01, 2012. On Saturday, March 24, 2012, a state of emergency was declared by both Fort Albany First Nations and Kashechewan First Nations. Due to warmer temperatures, early ice break up on the Albany River caused waterways to jam and the water level to rise in low-lying communities. Evacuations of both communities commenced with 54 of the most vulnerable residents who were flown to the Town of Kapuskasing on March 24, and continued until a total of 269 people had been evacuated to both the Towns of Kapuskasing and Wawa by March 25. On March 31, 2012, colder temperatures and observations of ice movement resulted in the Chief and Band Council terminating the declared emergency. All 269 evacuees were repatriated by April 1, 2012. Emergency Management Ontario and the federal Ministry of Natural Resources co-ordinated the evacuation with the help of federal, municipal and First Nations officials. Although emergency management is a provincial/territorial responsibility, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) accepts responsibility for supporting emergency management in First Nations communities and manages the consequences arising from the emergency such as disruptions to community-level critical services delivered in the First Nation.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Kashechewan and Fort Albany ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: March 24, 2012 Evacuated: 269
Estimated Total Cost: $6,700,000
Comments Kashechewan and Fort Albany ON, March 24 to April 01, 2012. A state of emergency was declared when rapid snowmelt and early ice break-up caused flooding along the Albany river. The flood forced the evacuation of approximately 269 residents to the towns of Kapuskasing and Wawa. All evacuees were able to return to their homes by April 1, 2012.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Rail Fatalities: 3
Place: Burlington ON Injured / Infected: 45
Event Date: February 26, 2012 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Burlington ON, February 26-27, 2012. VIA Rail passenger train No. 92 was travelling from Niagara Falls to Toronto. At 15:23 EDT, the train was approaching Burlington while entering crossover track No. 5 at 67 mph, which was 4.5 times the authorized speed limit. Subsequently, the locomotive and all five cars carrying 70 passengers derailed. Three crewmembers were fatally injured and 45 people sustained various injuries. The locomotive fuel tank was punctured and approximately 4,300 litres of diesel fuel was released into the environment. Site remediation work was contracted locally and monitoring wells were installed to monitor any potential ground water contamination.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Vehicle Fatalities: 11
Place: Hampstead, Ontario Injured / Infected: 3
Event Date: February 6, 2012 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments On February 6th just before 5:00 pm (local), a flatbed truck collided with a van at the intersection of Perth County Road 107 and Line 47 near the small town of Hampstead, ON. As a result of the collision, 10 of the van’s occupants, including several migrant workers, were killed as well as the driver of the truck. Of the 3 survivors, 1 sustained life-threatening injuries and 2 others sustained serious injuries.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: 1
Place: Goderich ON Injured / Infected: 37
Event Date: August 21, 2011 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $112,859,000
Comments Goderich ON, August 21-22, 2011. On August 21, an F3 tornado with 250 km/h winds touched down at 16:00 EDT in the town of Goderich causing severe damages. The extent of destruction included damages to residental and commercial property, downed trees, gas leaks and power outages. Natural gas was off to 90 per cent of the town as well as to residents in surrounding municipalities. As of 10:30 EDT on August 22, power had been restored to most of the affected area. The tornado was approximately 20 kilometres in length and left a path of destruction 200 to 1,500 metres wide. The tornado was responsible for one fatality and injured 37 other people. The F3 tornado that hit Goderich was the most powerful twister recorded in Ontario for more than a decade.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Northern Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 6, 2011 Evacuated: 3300
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Northern Ontario, July 6-25, 2011. A lighting storm on July 6 sparked a series of wildfires that spread throughout northern Ontario. Fire personnel were unable to gain control of the fires, which burned roughly 300,000 hectares of land. As of July 20, there were 112 wildfires burning in the region. Evacuation orders were put in place for communities in direct threat from the fires as well as those communities suffering from the impacts of smoke, power outages, food shortages and a lack of food storage capacity, since many communities are only accessible by air. The following evacuations occurred: 535 people from Deer Lake First Nations (FN), 260 people from Cat Lake FN, 50 people from Mishkeegogamang FN, 280 people from Eabametoong FN (Fort Hope), 197 people from Keewaywin FN, approximately 1000 people from Kingfisher Lake FN, approximately 770 people from Sandy Lake FN and approximately 200 people from North Spirit Lake. In addition, the entire communities of Keewaywin FN and Koocheching FN had been completely evacuated. In total, approximately over 3,300 people were evacuated. Wildfires severely damaged more than 86 hydro poles and over 13 kilometres of hydro lines, resulting in power outages across the northern region.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Mishkeegogamang Ojibway First Nation (New Osnaburgh) ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: June 21, 2011 Evacuated: 423
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Mishkeegogamang Ojibway First Nation (New Osnaburgh) ON, June 21-27, 2011. A state of emergency was declared as the First Nation community was overcome by smoke from more than 17 wildfires burning within 10 kilometres of the community’s housing area. The fire was estimated to be 37,000 hectares in size and was out control. There were 423 residents that were evacuated between June 22 and June 24. Sioux Lookout, Greenstone (Gerldton) and Ignace declared states of emergency. The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) deployed 10 fire ranger crews to bring the fires under control while the Department of National Defense (DND) assisted with evacuations, and Health Canada assisted with medical services.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storm - Unspecified / Other Fatalities: 2
Place: Southern Ontario and southern Quebec Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: April 27, 2011 Evacuated: 100
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments On April 27th and 28th, a weather system moved through southern Ontario and southern Quebec, and brought strong winds and severe thunderstorms. Ontario's first tornado of the season (April 27th) was confirmed; an EF0 near Fergus, ON. Wind warnings were also issued across many parts of southern Ontario. With this, there was widespread wind damage and other storm-related damage. In St. Catharines, for example, Lockview Public School experienced significant roof damage during school hours. The high winds also caused bridge closures including the Garden City Skyway after a tractor trailer blew over. Additionally, the storm caused flooding in Quebec; 100 residents were evacuated in Coaticook when the Coaticook River flooded its banks. This system also caused a few injuries and 2 fatalities. The insurable losses in both Ontario and Quebec was estimated to be $199.9 million (2011 CAD).
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: 1
Place: Lambton County ON Injured / Infected: 1
Event Date: December 12, 2010 Evacuated: 625
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Lambton County ON, December 12-14, 2010. A severe winter storm caused severe road closures including London Line and Highway 402 in Lambton County. A county emergency was declared on December 13. The next day on December 14, a snow streamer accompanied by heavy winds swept through the region creating a hazard for drivers on the road. In total, there were approximately over 625 people stranded on area roads who had to be rescued and taken to warming centres. The majority of stranded drivers were trapped in their vehicles for up to six hours meaning that many people were forced to spend the night in their vehicles. The Canadian Armed Forces used two Griffin helicopters to assist the Ontario Provincial Police in rescuing 237 motorists stranded in their vehicles along Highway 402. One officer received a minor injury while trying to reach stranded motorists and one man was found dead from exposure to the elements.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Heat Event Fatalities: 280
Place: Ontario and Quebec Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 3, 2010 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Between July 3rd and 9th, a heat wave gripped Ontario and Quebec. In Toronto, paramedics received 51% more complaints about breathing problems and 39% more calls related to fainting. In Ottawa, the RCMP musical ride was cancelled. In Montreal, heat-related deaths doubled. Across 8 health regions of Quebec, there was a 33% increase in mortality rate (280 excess deaths).
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Midland ON Injured / Infected: 20
Event Date: June 23, 2010 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $17,000,000
Comments Midland ON, June 23, 2010. Two tornadoes touched down in Ontario’s Cottage County. An F2 tornado with wind speeds of up to 240 km/h touched down in Midland at 18:30 EST. Another F1 tornado with wind speeds of up to 170 km/h touched down in Washago at 19:00 EST. In Midland, 50 trailers were destroyed and 20 others were damaged. Additionally another 100 residential buildings were damaged by the F2 tornado that also uprooted trees and downed power lines. It was reported that 20 people were sent to the hospital for injures. Ontario provided immediate provincial assistance of up to $1 million to aid in cleanup and repairs.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Leamington ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: June 6, 2010 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $223,864
Comments Leamington ON, June 6, 2010. An F1 tornado touched down in Leamington prompting city officials to declare a local state of emergency. The small community located in the southern region of Essex County was hit by an F1 tornado as well as a series of strong winds called downbursts early in the morning on June 6. The F1 tornado produced winds of up to 180 km/h, which destroyed approximately 12 homes, downed power lines and uprooted trees. Approximately 4,500 hydro customers (13,500 individuals) were left without power. The Canadian Red Cross assisted with response efforts by providing an emergency shelter. There were no reported injuries or fatalities.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Chapleau ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 27, 2010 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Chapleau ON, May 27, 2010. A forest fire, which started in the Chapleau area near Wawa, burned through approximately 22 hydro poles and caused a power outage affecting approximately 2,000 local residents.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: 1
Place: Toronto, Windsor, Vaughan and Newmarket ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: August 20, 2009 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $96,183,000
Comments Toronto, Windsor, Vaughan and Newmarket ON, August 20, 2009. A super cell storm developed just south of Lake Huron and tracked northeastward for a remarkable 200 kilometres. The heat and humidity in Ontario increased once the clouds disappeared. A squall line developed over Lower Michigan and traveled across the Great Lakes reaching southern Ontario at 15:00 EDT. This system produced powerful winds from Windsor to northeast of Toronto as well as destructive tornadoes in Vaughan and Newmarket. While these tornadoes were wreaking havoc just north of Toronto, another series of super cell thunderstorms spawned tornadoes in parts of Simcoe County, Muskoka and Parry Sound Districts to the east of Georgian Bay and north towards Lake Nipissing. In total, the day’s weather produced 19 confirmed tornadoes, including: four F0, eleven F1, and four F2. This was the greatest number of F2 tornadoes in Ontario in one day since the Barrie/central Ontario tornadoes of May 31, 1985. It was also a new Canadian record for the most confirmed tornadoes in one day. Violent winds snapped trees, lifted roofs, flattened cars, mowed down fences, collapsed farm buildings, and inflicted property losses around $100 million. The first tornado of the day touched down in the town of Durham in Grey County, killing a young boy as he left a nearby conservation area day camp. About 600 homes, mostly in the communities of Maple and Woodbridge were damaged. Fourty were destroyed and declared unsafe. At the peak of the storm, Hydro One reported that 69,000 customers (approximately 207,000 individuals) had lost power.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Hamilton and Toronto ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 26, 2009 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $173,312,000
Comments Hamilton and Toronto ON, July 26, 2009. A storm cell stalled over the western end of Lake Ontario. Hamilton was hard hit. Waves of thunderstorms pounded the city, leaving citizens with flooded basements and motorists stuck in traffic caused by road closures. The midday downpour turned Red Hill Creek into an angry brown torrent that forced the closure of nearby roads and highways. Water gushed into 7000 basements and power was shut off to thousands of customers. While the Hamilton Airport observed only 28 mm of rain, radar estimates confirmed rainfall amounts in an unofficial gauge totaling 110 mm in two hours - worse than a 100-year storm and one of the most intense short-duration rainfalls on record in Canada. Conditions were made worse because the ground was super-saturated from storms two days earlier. In Toronto, parts of Lakeshore Boulevard near the Exhibition grounds were submerged. To the north, a pair of giant sinkholes swallowed part of Finch Avenue West - big enough to hold a fleet of cars and deep enough to cover a four-storey building.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Ottawa, Toronto and Windsor ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: April 25, 2009 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $40,981,000
Comments Ottawa, Toronto and Windsor ON, April 25, 2009. A spate of fierce thunderstorms broke out across southwestern, southcentral and eastern Ontario. Winds at Toronto Pearson International Airport gusted to 115 km/h, the strongest wind gusts reported since January 1978. Power lines and trees came down across the province, knocking out power to 100,000 customers (300,000 individuals). Embedded in the thunderstorm cluster were marble-sized hail near Parry Sound, waterspouts in the Ottawa River, straight-line winds and weak tornados in Windsor and Ottawa. In Windsor, the roof was ripped off a union hall building with chunks of roofing and shards of glass littering the lawn and front steps. At Ottawa's Rockcliffe Flying Club, winds damaged 18 planes. Both tornados were F0 in intensity with winds of up to 110 km/h.
Event Type: Biological | Pandemic Fatalities: 425
Place: Across Canada Injured / Infected: 8582
Event Date: April 1, 2009 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Across Canada, April 1, 2009 to February 1, 2010. A new strain of pandemic influenza. The first cases were seen in Mexico and it spread quickly across the globe. In Canada, there were 8,582 hospitalizations, 1,448 cases admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) and 425 deaths.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Kingston ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: September 15, 2008 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Kingston ON, September 15, 2008. An overnight wind and rainstorm hit Kingston, cut power to thousands of homes in the area, knocked one ferry out of service and toppled small buildings. Kingston received 20 mm of rain overnight and was hit with wind gusts of 67 km/h. Across southeast Ontario, 25,000 homes and businesses (approximately 75,000 individuals) lost power.
Event Type: Explosion | Non-Residential Fatalities: 2
Place: Toronto ON Injured / Infected: 58
Event Date: August 10, 2008 Evacuated: 12000
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Toronto ON, August 10, 2008. A series of explosions at North York’s Sunrise Propane Industrial Gases Plant forced the evacuation of 12,000 people living inside a 1.6 kilometre radius of the area. The explosion produced a huge mushroom-shaped fireball that blew out windows and shook the houses of nearby residents. In total, the explosion destroyed 100 homes. Paramedics treated 40 people on site, six people were taken to the hospital and 18 admitted themselves. The explosion killed one Sunrise employee as well as a 25-year veteran of the Toronto Fire Service who died from heart attacked while fighting the fire.
Event Type: Biological | Epidemic Fatalities: 22
Place: Across Canada Injured / Infected: 57
Event Date: August 1, 2008 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Across Canada, August 1, 2008. Listeria monocytogenes spread by contaminated Maple Leaf food products produced at its Bartor Road plant. The outbreak occurred in August 2008. A segment of the population that is most vulnerable became exposed. 57 people became seriously ill and 22 people died.
Event Type: Explosion | Residential Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Toronto ON Injured / Infected: 10
Event Date: July 20, 2008 Evacuated: 900
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Toronto ON, July 20, 2008. Hundreds of residents of an east-Toronto apartment tower were evacuated after an explosion occurred in the basement of the building. Firefighters were called to respond to smoke coming from an underground hydro vault in the basement of the building when an explosion erupted, sending a shock wave throughout the many floors of the apartment tower. Ten people were injured, including nine firefighters. Approximately 900 people were evacuated from the building. Some nearby homes were also evacuated.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: James Bay ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 9, 2008 Evacuated: 1200
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments James Bay ON, May 9, 2008. A serious flood risk forced about 1,200 people from their homes along the coast of James Bay.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Albany River ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: April 25, 2008 Evacuated: 1900
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Albany River ON, April 25, 2008. More than a dozen aircraft were poised to help evacuate nearly 1,900 residents of Kashechewan and Fort Albany, reserves in the coastal area of James Bay, some 450 kilometres north of Timmins.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Trent Hills ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: April 17, 2008 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Trent Hills ON, April 17, 2008. Over a period of 24 hours, water levels in the tri-lakes (Chemong, Buckhorn and Pigeon) increased 120 mm. The municipality of Trent Hills declared a state of emergency.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Belleville ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: April 14, 2008 Evacuated: 18
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Belleville ON, April 14, 2008. Water from the Moira River flooded dozens of homes and shut down roads in Belleville prompting a state of emergency to be declared. Approximately 50 homes were significantly flooded, including six homes (approximately 18 individuals) that were evacuated. Local wells were tainted with floodwater, which meant that residents could not drink from their wells.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Port Bruce ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: February 18, 2008 Evacuated: 300
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Port Bruce ON, February 18, 2008. The small community of Port Bruce, located at the mouth of Catfish Creek in Lake Erie east of Port Stanley, was flooded due to an ice jam that caused the creek to overflow. It was the second time in two weeks that Port Bruce experienced flooding from the creek. However, on February 18, the flooding was more severe as water levels rose knee-deep in some areas forcing approximately 100 families (300 individuals) to evacuate their homes and preventing many others from leaving.
Event Type: Fire | Non-Residential Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Hamilton ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: June 3, 2007 Evacuated: 345
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Hamilton ON, June 3, 2007. An industrial fire occurred at a computer facility in Hamilton, involving 5000 square feet of pallets loaded with computer parts, casings and some of the empty plastic barrels located outside the building.
Event Type: Fire | Non-Residential Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Windsor ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 25, 2007 Evacuated: 2000
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Windsor ON, May 25, 2007. An explosion at an auto body shop sparked a fire that resulted in the evacuation of 600 homes and businesses including two schools (approximately 2000 individuals). A state of emergency was declared for a two-hour period mainly due to poor air quality. Concerns were raised over hazardous chemicals such as lacquer, paint thinner and gasoline that could have potentially fueled the fire. The auto body shop was completely destroyed while nearby homes and businesses were damaged.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Northwest Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 13, 2007 Evacuated: 300
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Northwest Ontario, May 13, 2007. Up to 300 people have been forced from their cottages in an area about 75kms west of Thunder Bay, where the biggest fire among many in Northwest Ontario, Thunder Bay #37, had raged through about 11,500 hectares.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Russell ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: December 1, 2006 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Russell ON, December 1-2, 2006. A major blackout, caused by a freezing rain storm, left virtually the entire town without electricity. The mayor declared a state of emergency, which lasted for several days.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Ontario and Quebec Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: October 29, 2006 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Ontario and Quebec, October 29, 2006. A storm that blew in from the United States left about 49,000 Quebec and 30,000 Ontario residents without power (approximately 240,000 individuals). High winds felled lines in a broad band across central Ontario, while in Quebec, the Laurentians region, north on Montreal, and the Gasp were particularly hard hit.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Fire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Amherstburg ON Injured / Infected: 3
Event Date: August 15, 2006 Evacuated: 1000
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Amherstburg ON, August 15, 2006. A huge fire at a plastics recycling plant forced hundreds of resiadents to flee their homes. Smoke was 20 meters high over the area and grew to roughly the size of two football fields.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: 2
Place: Northern and Central Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 17, 2006 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments On July 17th, one of the longest storm tracts in Ontario's history left a 400 kilometre long trail of damage. The series of severe storms produced funnel clouds, straight-line winds, and tornadoes. The areas with the most significant wind damage were Larder Lake, Manitoulin Island, Verner, Sturgeon Falls, North Bay, Calendar, French River, Mattawa, and Peterborough which experienced straight-line winds between 120-170 km/hr. In the evening, 2 tornadoes (an EF 1 and an EF 0) touched down in the Newmarket area. In addition to the property damage, there was extensive damage to Hydro One infrastructure including downed high-voltage circuits, 1,000 snapped electricity poles, 4,000 damaged insulators, and over 200 damaged transformer . The storm system eventually crossed over into Quebec where it continued to cause damage. Successive storms throughout July, August and September caused over $100 million in losses and Hydro One earned the Edison Electric Institute's Emergency Recovery Award for its outstanding efforts in restoring service.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Kashechewan ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: April 23, 2006 Evacuated: 1100
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Kashechewan ON, April 23, 2006. Spring flooding has forced hundreds of people to leave the northern Ontario reserve of Kashechewan. Kashechewan declared a state of emergency when water levels rose quickly and asked for immediate help from the province.
Event Type: Biological | Infestation Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Kashechewan ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: October 26, 2005 Evacuated: 1100
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Keshechewan ON, October 27, 2005. The Ontario government declared a state of emergency at the remote Keshechewan native reserve after discovering E.coli bacteria in the community's drinking water supply. The tainted drinking water forced the evacuation of the reserve, home of approximately 1,100. Seventy four people, mostly families with children suffering from skin rashes and chronic diarrhea, were immediately flown to Sudbury and hospitalized for medical treatment. Other remaining evacuees from the reserve were sent to other cities.
Event Type: Biological | Epidemic Fatalities: 23
Place: Toronto ON Injured / Infected: 112
Event Date: September 24, 2005 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Toronto ON, September 24, 2005. In the fall of 2005, a long-term care facility in the city of Toronto named Seven Oaks experienced an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease. A total of 135 people were infected (70 residents, 39 staff, 21 visitors, and 5 people who lived or worked near the home). Twenty-three residents died. For the first 10 days, the cause of the outbreak was unknown. On October 16, the Minister of Health and Long-Term Care established an Expert Review Panel on the Legionnaires' Disease Outbreak to assess the progress Ontario has made since SARS, to identify the key lessons from the recent Legionnaires' disease outbreak, and provide advice on how to strengthen infectious disease control in Ontario.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southern Ontario Injured / Infected: 4
Event Date: August 19, 2005 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $500,000,000
Comments Southern Ontario ON, August 19, 2005. A series of severe thunderstorms tracked eastward across southern Ontario from Kitchener to Oshawa. The system spawned two F2 tornadoes with gusts between 180 and 250 km/h. The first tracked through Milverton to Conestogo Lake and the second from Salem to Lake Bellwood. The tornadoes downed power lines, uprooted trees, ripped into several homes, cottages and barns, and overturned vehicles. Within one hour, torrential rains dumped 103 mm in North York, 100 mm in Downsview and 175 mm in Thornhill, leading to flash flooding. Fire fighters rescued four people who fell into the fast moving currents of the Don River. Thirty metres of Finch Avenue West was washed out. Early estimates report more than 15,000 insurance claims were submitted for structural and non-structural damages caused by torrential rains and high winds. Not included in insured losses were infrastructure damages.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Air Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Toronto, Ontario Injured / Infected: 33
Event Date: August 2, 2005 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments On August 2nd, Air France flight 358 from Paris to Toronto carrying 297 passengers and 12 crew members on board was preparing to land at Toronto's Pearson airport during a thunderstorm at 4:02pm (local) in the afternoon. During the landing, there was heavy rain, poor visibility and lightning strikes. The aircraft was not able to stop before the end of the 2.7 km long runway, crashed in the ravine adjacent to the runway and caught fire. All 309 individuals successfully evacuated the aircraft. In total, 33 individuals were taken to hospital, 21 of those had minor injuries and 12 had serious injuries.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Kashechewan ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: April 23, 2005 Evacuated: 200
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Kashechewan ON, April 23, 2005. Nearly 200 people were flown out of the remote First Nations reserve in northern Ontario to Moosonee after flooding filled 39 basements with raw sewage. Spring flooding on the Albany River caused the sewage system to back up and contaminated the community water system.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Peterborough, Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 14, 2004 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments On July 14, a large rain storm settled in near Peterborough, ON. In the early hours of July 15, over 235 mm of rain fell – which was typically a summer's worth of rain in the region. It was one of the wettest days in Ontario's history, and the rain continued for the next 5 days. There was extensive flooding in Peterborough; most of the downtown area and a third of the city was flooded under a metre of water. The wastewater system was at 5 times the capacity leading to backed up sewers. A State of Emergency was declared and in effect for 15 days. Clean-up efforts took months, while some of the city’s infrastructure needed to be rebuilt. The Province of Ontario provided $25 million for emergency repair and restoration of municipal infrastructure, the insured losses were over $83 million (CAD 2004).
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Attawapiskat ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 19, 2004 Evacuated: 1700
Estimated Total Cost: $5,700,000
Comments Attawapiskat ON, May 19, 2004. Due to ice-jam flooding in the Attawapiskat River, approximately 1,700 people from the James Bay Cree First Nation community of Attawapiskat were evacuated by air to Moosonee, Cochrane and Timmins.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Air Fatalities: 10
Place: Off Pelee Island, Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 17, 2004 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments On January 17th, a Cessna Caravan departed Pelee Island airport at 4:38pm (local) carrying 9 passengers and the pilot. However, at 7:08pm, the United States Coast Guard spotted wreckage 3 km from the end of the runway. Although the weather conditions were poor at the time, the accident was attributed to a 15% weight exceedance and ice contamination on the aircraft. All 10 individuals and 2 hunting dogs were killed in the accident.
Event Type: Infrastructure failure | Energy Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Ontario, Midwest and Northeast USA Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: August 14, 2003 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Ontario, Midwest and Northeast USA, August 14, 2003. Approximately 50 million (over 9 million in Ontario) people were affected by a blackout, some experiencing power outages for over 48 hours. A combination of employee, equipment, and monitoring failures ultimately led to the blackout. The initial triggering power outage was prompted by contact between sagging transmission lines and untrimmed trees in Ohio.
Event Type: Biological | Epidemic Fatalities: 44
Place: Across Canada, largely in the Greater Toronto area Injured / Infected: 375
Event Date: March 13, 2003 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Across Canada, 13 March to August, 2003. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) emerged in November 2002 in Asia. It is described as a droplet-spread viral illness. The outbreak affected Toronto and the Greater Toronto Area the most. According to the Government of Ontario, there were 375 probable and suspected cases and 44 deaths.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Rail Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Tyendinaga Township First Nation ON Injured / Infected: 2
Event Date: February 21, 2003 Evacuated: 300
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Tyendenaga Township First Nation ON, February 21, 2003. Two Canadian Pacific freight trains carrying hazardous materials collided, derailed and exploded in Tyendenaga Township First Nation near Melrose, Ontario. Two crewmembers were injured and approximately 300 people were forced to leave their homes. The township declared a state of emergency and ordered evacuation within a 2 km area of the site.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Rail Fatalities: 1
Place: Brantford ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: November 16, 2002 Evacuated: 120
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Brantford ON, November 16, 2002. Eight train cars were derailed as a result of a collision with a van. The derailed cars rolled down an embankment that adjoined a neighbourhood, causing 120 people from the immediate area to be evacuated for two days. There were no leaks reported, but the cars contained a residue of butylene and butane.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Leak / Spill Release Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Dryden ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 30, 2002 Evacuated: 350
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Dryden ON, July 30, 2002. A chlorine dioxide leak at a nearby paper mill caused 300 to 400 people to be evacuated from the immediate downwind area.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Kee-Way-Win FN; Townships of Terrace Bay and Schrieber; Village of Rossport; Pays Plat FN; Deer Lake FN, ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 1, 2002 Evacuated: 985
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Kee-Way-Win FN; Townships of Terrace Bay and Schrieber; Village of Rossport; Pays Plat FN; Deer Lake FN, ON, July 2002. Members of several communities were concerned by nearby fires and smoke. More than 1000 people were evacuated to Thunder Bay, Geraldton and Sioux Lookout. Municipal emergency declarations occurred in six communities.
Event Type: Fire | Non-Residential Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Kingsville ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: June 21, 2002 Evacuated: 2500
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Kingsville ON, June 21, 2002. Four million pounds of styrene incinerated.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Municipalities of Ignace, Fort Frances, Rainy River, Alberton, Atikokan, Chapple, Dawson, Emo, La Valle, Lake of the Woods, Morley, Machin; Township of Sioux-Narrows - Nestor Falls, ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: June 9, 2002 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $6,975,854
Comments Municipalities of Ignace, Fort Frances, Rainy River, Alberton, Atikokan, Chapple, Dawson, Emo, La Valle, Lake of the Woods, Morley, Machin; Township of Sioux-Narrows - Nestor Falls ON, June 9-11, 2002. Parts of northwestern Ontario were declared disaster areas because of severe flooding. Roads and highways were washed out and closed, power and telecommunication lines were disrupted, and private properties were greatly damaged.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Attawapiskat First Nation ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 1, 2002 Evacuated: 1200
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Attawapiskat FN, ON, May 2002. Approximately 1200 people were evacuated to Moosonee and Timmins following the flooding of the Attawapiskat River. A municipal state of emergency was declared.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Morley, Chapple, Dawson, Emo, Lake of the Woods, La Vallee, Rainy River, Fort Frances ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 31, 2001 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $869,596
Comments Morley, Chapple, Dawson, Emo, Lake of the Woods, La Vallee, Rainy River, Fort Frances ON, July 31, 2001. A severe summer storm hit eight municipalities and two rural areas in northwestern Ontario. These were declared disaster areas, and the damages were covered by the Ontario government. Effects of the storm include fallen trees, washed out roads, tossed boats, and broken docks.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Drought Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Across Canada, concentrated in Saskatchewan and Alberta Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: June 1, 2001 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Across Canada, concentrated in Saskatchewan and Alberta, Spring 2001 to Fall 2002. A severe drought was felt across all Canada, affecting 41,000 people, with the most devastating impacts felt in Saskatchewan and Alberta. Record to near-record drought, as indicated by the Palmer Drought Severity Index, was recorded at several climate stations in 2001. The winter of 2001-2002 continued the dry trend and brought above normal temperatures. Fall 2002 brought much needed precipitation to relieve much of the drought, though dry conditions did remain in places. The repercussions of the drought included agricultural production, employment, crop and livestock production, and the Gross Domestic Product.
Event Type: Biological | Epidemic Fatalities: 6
Place: Walkerton ON Injured / Infected: 2300
Event Date: May 19, 2000 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Walkerton ON, May 19 - July 14, 2000. E. coli O157:H7 and Campylobacter jejuni bacteria contaminated Walkerton's drinking water supply through Well 5, sickening more than 2,300 people and killing six. The primary contamination source was manure spread on a farm near Well 5. Contributing factors to this disaster, as identified by the Report on the Walkerton Inquiry, included failure to use continuous cholorine and turbidity monitors, improper operating practices at the Walkerton Public Utilities Commission, and the provincial government's budget reductions to the Ministry of Environment.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southern Ontario Injured / Infected: 1
Event Date: April 20, 2000 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Southern Ontario, April 20-21, 2000. The Windsor area registered 95 mm of rain in a 24-hour period and the storm dumped almost 70 mm of rain on the London area, Sarnia got 50 mm, while 40 mm fell on the Toronto area. Sewers were backed up and roads washed out, and many short power outages occurred. One child suffered injuries in Toronto due to violent winds, which gusted up to 80 km/h.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Rail Fatalities: 1
Place: Limehouse, Ontario Injured / Infected: 17
Event Date: November 9, 1999 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments At 9:00am (local) on November 9th, a VIA/Amtrak rail passenger train struck a dump truck at a crossing near Limehouse, ON. The collision derailed the VIA locomotive and 4 Amtrak passenger cars. The collision caused 17 injuries, 2 of those serious, and the death of the truck driver.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Rail Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Key River, Ontario Injured / Infected: 4
Event Date: September 23, 1999 Evacuated: 5
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments At 1:11pm (local) on September 23rd, 26 freight cars derailed near Key River, ON, and adjacent to Little Key River. Of the several cars that derailed, one containing liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and another containing anhydrous ammonia ruptured, leaked, and ignited. Only a few minutes later (1:48pm), another tank car loaded with LPG exploded. In total, 127,000 pounds of LPG and 158,000 pounds of anhydrous ammonia were released - most of which burned. A police office, 2 firefighters and a woodcutter were exposed to ammonia vapours and suffered minor injuries. Although no evacuation of nearby communities was needed, 3 local woodcutters and 2 hunters were evacuated from the area. Within 2 days, containment dams were installed up- and downstream of the derailment site. After 36 hours of rain, the containment dams breached on September 30th, and un-ionized ammonia was leaked into the river. High levels of contaminants persisted for 12 hours, and dead minnows were observed on October 2nd.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Vehicle Fatalities: 7
Place: Windsor ON Injured / Infected: 33
Event Date: September 3, 1999 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Windsor ON, September 3, 1999. Dense fog and high speed are blamed for a massive car pileup/accident on Hwy. 401 near Windsor. At least 40 vehicles collided, including transport trucks, vans and cars, resulting in seven deaths and 33 injuries. The intensity of the fire, which caused the road's asphalt to melt, and the fire damage, which destroyed many of the vehicles, made it impossible to fully understand how the collisions occurred. At least five separate accidents occurred, blocking both sides of the highway.
Event Type: Infrastructure failure | Communications Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Across Toronto, Canada, and internationally Injured / Infected: 2
Event Date: July 16, 1999 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Across Toronto, Canada, and internationally, July 16, 1999. During regular maintenance at the Bell Canada Switching Station, a repairman dropped a wrench into high-voltage equipment, resulting in a fire that disabled the switch and brought down at least 113,000 telecommunications lines across Toronto, Canada, and internationally. Confusion between various technical and procedural fail-safes prevented service from being restored for about 12 hours.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Kenora ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: June 18, 1999 Evacuated: 12
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Kenora ON, June 18-19, 1999. Heavy rains from an intense storm resulted in 144 mm of precipitation falling in 18 hours on the town of Kenora on June 18. A State of Emergency was declared on June 19. The storm caused 3 mudslides, the flooding of a dozen houses, backup of sewers with raw sewage pouring into the streets, rivers and lakes, and damage to 200 graves at the Kenora cemetery. A portion of the TransCanada highway was washed out causing over $1 million dollars in damage.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Beardmore ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 4, 1999 Evacuated: 307
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Beardmore ON, May 1999. There were 60 fires burning in the province. A 50,540 ha fire forced 300 residents from Beardmore to move to Geraldton on May 4. Another 17,000 ha fire forced the evacuation of the Bearskin Lake First Nation (375 residents) and Pic Mobert First Nation (400 residents) on May 6. The fires forced the closure of sections of Highways 11 and 17. The evacuees were allowed to return home on May 8. The Canadian Forces provided humanitarian assistance in Geraldton and Bearskin Lake.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Rail Fatalities: 2
Place: Thamesville ON Injured / Infected: 60
Event Date: April 23, 1999 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Thamesville ON, April 23, 1999. A Via Rail train ploughed into 4 stationary freight tank cars, near Thamesville ON, killing its 2 engineers. Dozens of passengers were quickly evacuated from the train, which was carrying 5 crew and 180 passengers. The cause of the crash was a rail switch left in the wrong position which forced the Toronto-bound train to veer off the main track.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: East of Lake Winnipeg MB Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: March 5, 1999 Evacuated: 1107
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments East of Lake Winnipeg MB, March 5, 1999. Forests in Ontario and Manitoba were consumed by this event.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Barrie ON Injured / Infected: 30
Event Date: February 13, 1999 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Barrie ON, February 13, 1999. A huge accident occurred on Hwy 400 near Barrie between Hwy 89 and Dunlop St. Up to 150 vehicles were involved in the crash, which spread over a 2 km stretch of highway. At least 30 people were injured, 6 in critical condition. Poor winter weather and whiteout conditions were blamed for the accident.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: 2
Place: Toronto ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 13, 1999 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $122,000,000
Comments Toronto ON, January 13-15, 1999. Less than 2 weeks after Toronto was dumped with 40 cm of snow (see 1999.002), another major storm dumped 78 cm of snow on the city, bringing the total to 118 cm. The storm shut down parts of the city's transit system and left thousands stranded. An estimated 1.4 million commuters were unable to use public transit. Pearson airport cancelled 70 flights and delayed others, schools were also closed. Mayor Mel Lastman declared a second snow emergency and called in the military to help with snow cleanup, and city protection. More than 430 soldiers set up residence in Toronto. Brawling between commuters ensued January 13, when the subway shut down. Snowblowers from all over Ontario, and even PEI were called in to help. At least 2 deaths occurred in Southern Ontario. Other areas that were affected were Chatham-Kent region, which also called in for military assistance. The storm affected virtually all 7.1 million residents of Southern Ontario and continued east on January 15 to wreak havoc on the Maritimes.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: 11
Place: Southern Ontario Injured / Infected: 7
Event Date: January 3, 1999 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $168,469,000
Comments Southern Ontario, January 3, 1999. Eleven people died January 3 while shovelling heavy wet snow from one of the fiercest storms to hit southern and central Ontario in years. Cities were buried under 40 cm of snow. The storm - which also packed powerful wind gusts up to 70 km/h, ice pellets and freezing rain - moved in a line from Windsor northeast to Ottawa and Quebec. Many airports, including Pearson International in Toronto were closed.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Northern Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 4, 1998 Evacuated: 1865
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Northern Ontario, July 1998. During the month of July, there were over 130 fires in Northern Ontario. Approximately 1,425 people were evacuated from various communities, and over 3,700 hectares of forest was burnt. Main fires occurred near the following regions: Bearskin Lake, Terrace Bay, Kasabonika Lake, Summer Beaver, Webique, Muskrat Lake, Thunder Bay and Lansdowne.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Eastern Ontario and Quebec Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: March 28, 1998 Evacuated: 3757
Estimated Total Cost: $27,741,685
Comments Eastern Ontario and Quebec, March 28 - April 15, 1998. Warm weather and thunderstorms caused spring flooding. In Ontario, the Clyde River, Ottawa River, Mississippi River and rivers feeding Lake Nipissing overflowed. The lower Trent System below Peterborough from Rice Lake to Bay of Quinte also experienced flooding. States of Emergency were declared in these communities: Lanark Highlands, Village of Kearney, Township of Drummond, North Elmsley, Beckwith Township, Carleton Place and Mississippi Mills. In Quebec, over 15 rivers flooded and caused the evacuation of 3,697 people in 140 municipalities. Rivers on the North Shore of St. Lawrence River, St. Lawrence River, Assumption River, Chateauguay River, Richelieu River, Ottawa River, Lake St. Pierre and Lake Champlain flooded. Damage mainly occurred in the Montérégie and Mauricie regions.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: 35
Place: Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick Injured / Infected: 945
Event Date: January 4, 1998 Evacuated: 17800
Estimated Total Cost: $4,635,720,433
Comments Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick, January 4-10, 1998. Freezing rain (50 to >100mm) fell in a corridor extending from Kingston-to Ottawa-to Montreal to the Monteregie area south and east of Montreal, and on into New Brunswick, caused massive power outages. At the height of the disaster: More than 200 Quebec communities declared a disaster; 1,291,500 residences (affecting 3,228,750 people) were without power; 57 Ontario communities declared a disaster; 250,000 customers (1,500,000 people) were without power in Eastern Ontario.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Rail Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Toronto, Ontario Injured / Infected: 56
Event Date: November 19, 1997 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments On November 19th at 4:16pm (local), 2 GO trains collided in Toronto. One train was carrying over 800 passengers and had just departed Union Station. The second train was empty, and was reversing on the same line as the first. Although this was a relatively low speed collision (the first train at ~20 km/hr and the second at ~3 km/hr), 54 passengers and 2 crew members sustained minor injuries.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Fire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Hamilton ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 10, 1997 Evacuated: 4000
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Hamilton ON, July 10, 1997. A plastics recycling plant caught fire and caused severe air pollution; an evacuation for residents living within 15 blocks of the fire involved approximately 4000 people; an evacuation centre was set up. The plant was mainly recycled plastics, polyvinyl chloride, from the auto industry. 400 metric tonnes of plastic burned, releasing toxic gases and fallout. The fire burned for 77 hours. The warehouse did not have a fire suppressant system.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Iroquois Falls, Kirkland Lake, Timmins areas ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: June 12, 1997 Evacuated: 823
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Iroquois Falls, Kirkland Lake, Timmins areas ON, June 12, 1997. A fire burning southeast of Timmins burned hydro wires which left the town of Foleyet without power for one day; people were evacuated from approximately 750 homes in the Westin Lake, Watabeag Lake (south of Iroquois Falls), Sesekinika and Kenogami (west of Kirkland Lake) areas; 73 people from the Wahgoshig First Nation were evacuated to Timmins.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Timmins ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 29, 1997 Evacuated: 400
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Timmins ON, May 29, 1997. The city declared an emergency when a 100 hectare forest fire jumped the Mattagami River, forcing a one day evacuation of approximately 400 residents.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Durham ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 9, 1997 Evacuated: 200
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Durham ON, January 9, 1997. The mayor of Durham declared a State of Emergency due to flooding of the Saugeen River; approximately 200 residents evacuated; some businesses and schools closed; sewage backup; relief efforts continued for over a week due to poor weather conditions, most evacuees had returned by Jan. 24, 1997. Flooding also occurred on Feb. 22-23 1997.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Ottawa ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: August 8, 1996 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $21,308,000
Comments Ottawa ON, August 8, 1996.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Atikokan ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 5, 1996 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $278,061
Comments Atikokan ON, July 5-6, 1996.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Timmins and Dufferin County ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 17, 1996 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $378,557
Comments Timmins and Dufferin counties ON, May 17-19, 1996.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Grey County, Wellington and Dufferin County ON Injured / Infected: 9
Event Date: April 20, 1996 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $9,404,772
Comments Grey, Wellington, and Dufferin counties ON, April 20, 1996. Two F3 class tornadoes touched down in Grey County (Holland Centre), Wellington and Dufferin County. Significant property damage occurred; 9 people were injured by the 2 tornadoes. -80.54 44.122
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storm - Unspecified / Other Fatalities: Unknown
Place: South Dumfries ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 1, 1996 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $99,870
Comments South Dumfries ON, 1996.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: 1
Place: Southern Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: December 10, 1995 Evacuated: 50
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Southern Ontario, December 10-11, 1995. An early Snowstorm hit southern Ontario with 1015 cm of snow accompanied by wind gusts of up to 90 km/h and a temperature of -40ºC. The storm caused the closing of highways, shopping centres and bridges, including the Peace Bridge between Ontario and New York. Muskoka airport and weather office were evacuated and Bracebridge had to enforce its municipal emergency plan. An elderly man's death was attributed to the storm.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Leak / Spill Release Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Sudbury ON Injured / Infected: 20
Event Date: November 16, 1995 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Sudbury ON, November 16, 1995. A cloud of sulphur dioxide was accidentally released from a copper refinery and passed over a part of the city; the leak was from a faulty sample port in the section of the system where sulphur dioxide is converted to sulphuric acid, and the gas was released before conversion; hundreds of residents suffered minor irritations (eye irritations, respiratory problems...); a hospital and a clinic were evacuated; a legal action follow-up occurred.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Hamilton ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: October 5, 1995 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $17,419,000
Comments Hamilton ON, October 5-6, 1995.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Rail Fatalities: 3
Place: Toronto ON Injured / Infected: 140
Event Date: August 11, 1995 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Toronto ON, August 11, 1995. Two Toronto Transit Commission subway trains collided underground between two stations. Three commuters were killed and 140 other riders were injured. Problems with driver training and communications contributed to the accident. A rookie driver drove through three red lights and the fail-safe breaking system failed. The northbound train then rammed into another train which had stopped because of a faulty signal. The subway line was closed for eight and a half days.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southern Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 13, 1995 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $56,910,000
Comments Southern Ontario, July 13-15, 1995.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Rail Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Brighton, Ontario Injured / Infected: 46
Event Date: November 20, 1994 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments On November 20th at 6:20pm (local), a VIA rail passenger train struck a piece of rail that was intentionally placed on the track causing a fire that engulfed part of the locomotive and 2 passenger cars. The fire started almost immediately; windows began to shatter and melt as flames and smoke filled the first passenger car. When the passengers could not open the door to the next car, individuals began to panic - smashing out car windows and jumping from the train while still moving. When the door between the cars was opened, the second passenger car was in the same predicament. Eventually all passengers and on-board service employees were able to exit the 2 engulfed cars and locomotives. The other passenger cars were minimally affected and successfully evacuated. Of the 385 passengers, 15 were seriously injured and 31 had minor injuries.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southern ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: August 28, 1994 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $7,876,000
Comments Southern ON, August 28, 1994.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southern ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 28, 1994 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $6,799,000
Comments Southern ON, January 28, 1994.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southern ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 16, 1994 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $14,299,000
Comments Southern ON, January 16-17, 1994.
Event Type: Infrastructure failure | Manufacturing / Industry Fatalities: 2
Place: Kirkland Lake ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: November 26, 1993 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Kirkland Lake ON, November 26, 1993. Two miners were trapped following a rockburst 2 km below the surface: rescue efforts failed: the bodies were not recovered.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Quebec and Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: November 1, 1993 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Ontario and Quebec, November 1993 – March 1994.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Leak / Spill Release Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Windsor ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: October 17, 1993 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Windsor ON, October 17, 1993. A leaking fuel line connected to a storage tank released 4500 litres of fuel oil to the storm sewer system which leads to the outfall into the Little River and subsequently into the Detroit River; the outfall and then the entrance to the Detroit River were boomed; 30 to 40 ducks were affected; area Wildlife Rescue performed bird rescue and clean-up operations.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storm - Unspecified / Other Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Ontario and Quebec Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: November 12, 1992 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $76,000,000
Comments Ontario and Quebec, November 12-13, 1992.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Elmira ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: August 28, 1992 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $4,738,539
Comments Elmira ON, August 28, 1992.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Toronto ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 31, 1992 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $5,337,940
Comments Toronto ON, July 31, 1992.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Derailment Release Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Longlac ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 25, 1992 Evacuated: 800
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Longlac ON, May 25, 1992. A freight train carrying 4 ammonia cars derailed causing a small leak in two of the cars; the damaged cars were pumped off and the other two were vented, releasing 453.6 kg of anhydrous ammonia to the atmosphere in a remote area; 800 people were evacuated for 3 days.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Attawapiskat ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 18, 1992 Evacuated: 1000
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Attawapiskat ON, May 18, 1992. Approximately 1000 residents of this remote Cree village near James Bay were evacuated when the Attawapiskat River flooded.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Leak / Spill Release Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Sarnia ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: March 19, 1992 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Sarnia ON, March 19, 1992. A problem with a heat exchanger unit of a rubber manufacturing plant caused the release of 1500 kg of isobutylene to the St. Clair River in two consecutive spills, Mar. 19-20, 1992.; drinking water intakes were interrupted.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Leak / Spill Release Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Corunna ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 21, 1992 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Corunna ON, January 21, 1992. Abnormal discharge from a refinery of approximately 1000 kg of benzene, toluene and xylene into a sewer which drains to Telford Creek and St. Clair River; Wallaceburg and Walpole drinking water intakes were both closed for two days as the contamination moved down the river; a related fish kill was reported and the incident resulted in a conviction under the Ontario Environmental Protection Act.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Cold Event Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Prairies Provinces and Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 1, 1992 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $2,000,000
Comments Prairie Provinces and Ontario, Summer 1992. Unseasonable snow and frost during the months of June, July, and August caused massive damage to agricultural crops.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storm - Unspecified / Other Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Central Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: November 30, 1991 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $5,982,309
Comments Central Ontario, November 30, 1991.
Event Type: Fire | Residential Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Jarvis ON Injured / Infected: 1
Event Date: September 26, 1991 Evacuated: 1300
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Jarvis ON, September 26, 1991. 1300 evacuated; 1 injured; a natural gas explosion destroyed one house; the owner of the home suffered burns from the blast; the explosion was caused by gas seeping into a backyard well; all natural gas lines were turned off; electricity and phone lines were shut off to prevent sparks from triggering more explosions in the area off the north shore of Lake Erie; the area had to be evacuated; the evacuation lasted 4 days.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Rail Fatalities: Unknown
Place: North Bay, Ontario Injured / Infected: 71
Event Date: September 9, 1991 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments At 2:37pm (local) on September 9th, an Ontario Northland (ONR) passenger train struck the engine of a CN train near North Bay, ON. This occurred when a switch was not turned back to the main line and the passenger train was redirected to the track where the CN engine was waiting for the passenger train to pass. As a result, 60 passengers and 11 rail employees (ONR/CN) were injured (67 minor; 4 serious). Several injuries happened when unsecured luggage in overhead compartments fell onto passengers.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Fire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Sarnia ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 22, 1991 Evacuated: 5000
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Sarnia ON, July 22, 1991. 5000 residents evacuated; refinery fire.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Sarnia ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: March 27, 1991 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $28,310,657
Comments Sarnia ON, March 27, 1991.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Leak / Spill Release Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Cochrane ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 11, 1991 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Cochrane ON, January 11, 1991. The failure and explosion of a section of pipeline resulted in approximately 25.5 meters of pipe to blow out and release approx. 1 billion m³ of high pressure natural gas.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southern Ontario Injured / Infected: 6
Event Date: August 29, 1990 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $792,167
Comments Southern Ontario, August 29, 1990. Tornadoes, high winds and thunderstorms caused crop damage and the destruction of several buildings in the communities of Lobo, Komoka, Frome, Port Stanley, Southwold and Kendall; 6 minor injuries were reported.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Fire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Harrow ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 23, 1990 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Harrow ON, July 23, 1990. A fire destroyed a warehouse containing fertilisers and chemical products; extinguished in seven hours, the debris, waste, and water used for extinction were disposed of as toxic waste; dead fish were found as far away as 11 km.
Event Type: Arson | Non-Residential Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Hagersville ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: February 12, 1990 Evacuated: 1700
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Hagersville ON, February 12, 1990. A fire was set by arsonists in a pile of 14 million used tires; the fire took 17 days to extinguish; the toxic runoff from the melting tires and the fear of toxins in the oily smoke became a prime focus for media attention. The Environment Canada accident report states that 1700 people were evacuated in a radius of 4 km for 17 days; the fire created 20,000 m³ of solid waste and contaminated an area of 4.5 ha with 12 to 50 m³ of floating liquid residue; 25 people were deprived of drinking water for 3 months.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Cold Event Fatalities: 7
Place: British Columbia to Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: December 18, 1989 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $536,488
Comments British Columbia to Ontario, December 1989 – January 1990. Two serious cold spells began on December 19-28, 1989; snow, wind, and ice knocked out power lines to 60,000 homes in southwestern British Columbia on January 17; 5 deaths in Manitoba were caused by exposure to the extreme cold; 2 deaths due to fatal accidents in Alberta; freezing caused pipes to burst in Ontario. Almost 65% of the BC's utilities 16,980,000 cubic metres reserve used up.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Vehicle Release Fatalities: 2
Place: Sudbury ON Injured / Infected: 1
Event Date: October 2, 1989 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Sudbury ON, October 2, 1989. A vehicle collision caused a transport truck carrying 42 tonnes of sulphuric acid to crash into a ditch; the tank was punctured by a rock, causing 30 tonnes of acid to be released; neutralization of the acid and a clean-up operation were required; two occupants of the vehicle were killed, the truck driver was injured.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Vehicle Release Fatalities: 1
Place: Ottawa ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: September 12, 1989 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Ottawa ON, September 12, 1989. The driver of a tank truck carrying 57 m³ of gasoline lost control and crashed into a public transport bus; both the truck and bus were destroyed by fire, and 40 m³ of gasoline were released; the only casualty was the truck driver who was killed.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Harrow, Kent, Essex, Leamington counties ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 19, 1989 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $13,807,000
Comments Harrow and Colchester South, Essex County ON, July 19-20, 1989. Widespread flooding due to 450 mm of rain in a 30-hour period; the rainfall was from an intense thunderstorm which was centred over Colchester South and appeared to be stationary over Harrow for most of its duration. Many were evacuated from areas of extreme flooding and erosion; a few injuries were reported, no deaths; utility service in some areas was disrupted. Kent and Leamington counties were also affected.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Air Fatalities: 24
Place: Dryden ON Injured / Infected: 45
Event Date: March 10, 1989 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Dryden ON, March 10, 1989. 24 dead, 45 injured: an Air Ontario F-28 passenger plane crashed shortly after take-off from a scheduled stop in Dryden.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Cold Event Fatalities: 13
Place: Yukon to Ontario Injured / Infected: 100
Event Date: January 30, 1989 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Yukon to Ontario, January 30, 1989. Freezing caused pipes to burst in British Columbia; 30.5 cm of snow in one day in Edmonton and the temperature plummeted from +3°C to -26°C in 7 hours; 13 weather related deaths; 8 died in Alberta, 2 motorists died due to icy roads in British Columbia, and 3 farmers froze to death in Saskatchewan; there were 28 frostbite victims in Calgary; 20,000 were affected in a power failure in British Columbia; pipes burst, schools closed down, ferries were cancelled, roads closed, and airports were shutdown; 100 frostbite cases were reported in Calgary; extensive agricultural damage was caused.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Albany and Attawapiskat River ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 1, 1989 Evacuated: 1000
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Albany and Attawapiskat Rivers ON, 1989. 1000 evacuated.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Derailment Release Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Sarnia ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 1, 1989 Evacuated: 250
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Sarnia ON, 1989. Train derailment releasing dangerous goods; 250 evacuated.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Fire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Dundas ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 1, 1989 Evacuated: 200
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Dundas ON, 1989. 200 evacuated.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Fire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Niagara Falls ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 1, 1989 Evacuated: 100
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Niagara Falls ON, 1989. 100 evacuated.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Fire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Courtland ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: December 17, 1988 Evacuated: 500
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Courtland ON, December 17, 1988. A fire of unknown origin swept through a series of fertiliser warehouses of an agricultural co-operative but was under control before reaching a neighbouring gas station; about 245 tonnes of the chemicals were destroyed; 500 people within a 1.5 km radius were evacuated for 7 hours; two warehouses were destroyed; concentrations of pollutants in the air and water were minimal (trace).
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Heat Event Fatalities: 14
Place: Ontario and Manitoba Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 5, 1988 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Central and Southern ON and Manitoba, July 5-11, 1988; 14 elderly people died in Ontario of heat related factors. Toronto on July 7 had a high of 37.2°C (hottest day since 1953). Six afternoon highs >35°C; air pollution levels soared, power and water consumption soared to record levels. On July 28 rotating black-outs eased the power drain with the potential of a complete power failure. Ice companies were overwhelmed with order and quickly sold out. Great Lakes water levels the lowest in more than a decade, with an expected further drop of 12.5 cm. Manitoba Hydro losses were $100 million in 1988; QB hydro cut sales to ON and US by 25%.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Leak / Spill Release Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Sarnia ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 24, 1988 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Sarnia ON, May 24, 1988. An electrical breakdown caused the accidental release of 9.6 tonnes of acrylonitryle into the St. Clair River; maximum concentration limits were detected, and the collection of drinking water from the river was stopped for two days.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Whitedog Lake ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 1, 1988 Evacuated: 500
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Whitedog Lake ON, 1988. 500 evacuated.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Goulais River ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 1, 1988 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Goulais River ON, 1988.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Valrita-Harty ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 13, 1987 Evacuated: 800
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Valrita-Harty ON, 1987. Entire village of 800 evacuated due to wildfire.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Lake St. Clair ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: April 4, 1987 Evacuated: 50
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Lake St. Clair ON, April 4, 1987. A storm with northerly winds of almost 60 km/h caused severe flood damage along Lake St. Clair; 50 evacuated; lower floors were flooded in 100 homes.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Eastern Ontario and Southwestern Quebec Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: December 24, 1986 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Eastern Ontario and Southwestern Quebec, December 24, 1986. 1 in 4 homes in Ottawa were left without electricity after 30 mm of freezing rain fell in 14 hours.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: 2
Place: Winisk ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 16, 1986 Evacuated: 129
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Winisk, Winisk River Northern ON, May 16, 1986. Precipitation was nearly three times normal in the western James Bay area of northern Ontario in March and April; as the snowpack melted, ice jams formed on the Winisk River; the river then overflowed its banks and Winisk was inundated; the isolation of the community, the magnitude of the flooding and a blizzard made rescue efforts difficult. Of the 131 residents, almost all were airlifted to safety; two died; the community was virtually destroyed; a new town site was developed upstream at Peawanuk.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Derailment Release Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Timmins ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: March 31, 1986 Evacuated: 5000
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Timmins ON, March 31, 1986. 4500-5000 evacuated; a railway tank car leaked thousands of litres of gasoline into storm sewers prompting an evacuation. The gas fumes resulted in several explosions and the destruction of two homes.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Fire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Stoney Creek ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 21, 1986 Evacuated: 1000
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Stoney Creek ON, 1986. Required the evacuation of 1000 residents due to a fire in an insecticide plant.
Event Type: Geological | Landslide Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Brantford ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 1, 1986 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Brantford ON, 1986.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Lake Huron and Lake Erie ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: December 2, 1985 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Lake Huron and Lake Erie ON, December 2, 1985. A storm with winds gusting up to 100 km/h severely affected shorelines with western exposures; erosion occurred on Lake Huron; on the eastern end of Lake Erie, cottages were destroyed; property and shore protection structures were damaged.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: 12
Place: Hopeville to Barrie ON Injured / Infected: 500
Event Date: May 31, 1985 Evacuated: 800
Estimated Total Cost: $83,992,000
Comments Hopeville to Barrie ON, May 31, 1985; 12 dead, hundreds injured; 800 homeless. More than 100 buildings were damaged, 300 houses were also destroyed. Severe thunderstorms and hail. Power outages, damage to 150 farms.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: 5
Place: Windsor ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 30, 1985 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $16,390,000
Comments Windsor-Leamington ON, May 30, 1985. Golf-ball sized hailstones smashed greenhouses and flattened crops.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Lake Erie ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: March 31, 1985 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Lake Erie ON, March 31 and April 6, 1985. Two separate storms hit the shoreline of Lake Erie; hardest hit were Point Pelee and Long Point located along the shore of the lake; the storms destroyed cottages, washed out access roads, eroded beaches, uprooted trees and breached dikes.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Chatham ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: February 23, 1985 Evacuated: 30
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Chatham ON, February 23 - March 2, 1985. The city of Chatham and agricultural land in Dover and Raleigh Townships downstream of Chatham experienced widespread flooding due to a combination of mild temperatures leading to snowmelt; the Thames River and McGregor and Indian Creeks overflowed due to snowmelt runoff; an estimated 1180 homes experienced flooding; a dam was damaged; an Ontario Provincial Police helicopter was used to evacuate 30 people in outlying areas.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Vehicle Release Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Smiths Falls ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 1, 1985 Evacuated: 200
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Smiths Falls ON, 1985. A truck accident at Smiths Falls, Ontario, resulted in the spill of dangerous goods, requiring the evacuation of hundreds of people.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: Unknown
Place: London ON Injured / Infected: 30
Event Date: September 2, 1984 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments London ON, September 2,1984. 30 injured.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: 1
Place: Eastern Ontario and Western Quebec Injured / Infected: 43
Event Date: July 15, 1984 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Eastern Ontario and Western Quebec, July 15, 1984. 1 dead, 43 injured; destruction of 300 houses. Québec: Sheenboro, Blue Sea Lake, Bouchette, Caymant Region of Outaouais. In Québec, 37 houses were damaged, 10 houses destroyed.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storm - Unspecified / Other Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Chesley ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: April 30, 1984 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $39,066,000
Comments Chesley, Bruce County ON, April 30, 1984.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: 2
Place: Southern Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: February 13, 1984 Evacuated: 150
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Southern Ontario, February 13-17, 1984. Toronto, Chatham, Dresden, Port Bruce, St. Thomas, and Brantford experienced flooding due to very mild weather and rainfall; ice jams formed on several rivers causing them to overflow; several roads were closed due to flooding, most of them along the St. Clair and Thames River in the southeastern part of Ontario; in Toronto, the Don Valley Parkway was closed in areas due to overflow in the Don River; two people died as they were swept away on Black Creek in Toronto; over a hundred were evacuated in southern Ontario; utilities were disrupted in some areas and businesses were forced to close.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Fire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Fort Frances ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 1, 1984 Evacuated: 200
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Fort Frances ON, 1984. Hundreds of people were evacuated from Fort Frances, Ontario.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Drought Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 14, 1983 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Ontario, 1983. Heat and drought stress resulted in low crop yields in Ontario. Heat caused roads and a rail to buckle on Aug. 3. The latter spilled 6 CP Rail freight cars carrying grain and 1 car carrying steel rails into the Cypress River.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Reeces Corners ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 3, 1983 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $111,591
Comments Reeces Corners ON, May 3, 1983.
Event Type: Terrorist | Bomb Attacks Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Toronto ON Injured / Infected: 10
Event Date: October 14, 1982 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Toronto, ON, October 14, 1982. Litton Industries, a manufacturer of American cruise missile components, was bombed. The small anarchist group, Direct Action, also known as the Squamish Five, claimed responsibility for the attack, which injured ten. The group also claimed responsibility for bombing a hydro sub-station in Vancouver, British Columbia, in their protest against pollution, pornography and the arms industry. The five key members of the group were arrested in January 1983 and served prison terms ranging from four to eight years.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Derailment Release Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Orillia ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: February 28, 1982 Evacuated: 1200
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Orillia ON, February 28, 1982. 1200 evacuated; a freight train hauling toxic chemicals and inflammable liquids was derailed near Orillia.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Cold Event Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Across Canada Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 5, 1982 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Across Canada, January 5-28, 1982. Three week cold spell; trucks and trains failed and were abandoned until milder weather came; a damaged steel bridge forced a 200 km detour of the Alaskan highway; more than 25 highways in Ontario were closed in areas due to blowing snow and poor visibility. In the northern Prairies, temperatures as low as -47°C were recorded on January 17.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Derailment Release Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Medonte ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 1, 1982 Evacuated: 200
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Medonte ON, 1982. A train derailment leaking toxic chemicals required the evacuation of hundreds of people.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southeastern ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: February 18, 1981 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $1,668,590
Comments Southeastern ON, February 18-20, 1981. The Ottawa and Rideau River basins in southeastern Ontario, as well as Toronto suffered flood damages.
Event Type: Fire | Residential Fatalities: 21
Place: Mississauga ON Injured / Infected: 35
Event Date: July 14, 1980 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Mississauga ON, July 14, 1980. A fire spread quickly through a nursing home; 21 dead; 35 injured.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Wildfire Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Red Lake ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: June 1, 1980 Evacuated: 5000
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Red Lake ON, June 1980. 43,664.76 ha of forest were destroyed by a fire, 5000 people had to be evacuated from the area, 3600 of which had to be airlifted to Winnipeg.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southern Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: March 21, 1980 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Southern Ontario, March 21-22, 1980. Southwestern Ontario experienced severe flooding, especially in the Ganaraska region and Lower Trent River; several businesses and roads were closed.
Event Type: Explosion | Non-Residential Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Essex, Ontario Injured / Infected: 2
Event Date: February 14, 1980 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments At 1:50am (local) on February 14th, a car struck a hardware store and ruptured the gas line in Essex, ON. Within minutes a gas employee had arrived to shut off the gas metre but an explosion (at 2:18am (local)) occurred before this could be done. A block of buildings including several businesses and apartments were destroyed. There were no fatalities and only 2 serious injuries. This was the second significant explosion to occur in Essex; the first being in 1907.
Event Type: Fire | Residential Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Hamilton ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 1, 1980 Evacuated: 600
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Hamilton ON, 1980. St. Joseph's Hospital, more than 600 patients evacuated by hundreds of staff, no deaths.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Derailment Release Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Mississauga ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: November 10, 1979 Evacuated: 225000
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Mississauga ON, November 10-16, 1979. A CPR train of 106 cars carrying many dangerous chemicals derailed near Morris Road in Mississauga and burst into flames, creating a spectacular explosion. The proximity of tank cars containing chlorine to propane tank cars that may have exploded, and released a toxic cloud of chlorine, forced the evacuation of 225,000 people.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: 2
Place: Woodstock ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: August 7, 1979 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Woodstock ON, August 7, 1979.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Central Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 12, 1979 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Central Ontario, May 12, 1979. The White, Mississagi, Goulais, Spanish and Wanapetei Rivers were some rivers that overflowed and caused flooding in May 1979. Roads and businesses were closed and utility services were disrupted in the community of White River.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Central Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: April 24, 1979 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Central Ontario, April 24, 1979. Areas around Lake Nipissing and along the Mississagi, Blind and Mattagami Rivers experienced flooding in April 1979. Several roads were closed near Lake Nipissing and the Mattagami River.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: 9
Place: Southern Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: April 5, 1979 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments On the evening of April 5th, a winter storm moved into Ontario. As the storm progressed overnight, the weather changed from rain to snow. By the 6th, the wind was blowing at roughly 50-65 km/hr with gusts of up to 119 km/hr. Blowing snow caused severe road conditions. There were two serious highway accidents along Highway 400 alone which involved 60 cars near Bradford. The strong winds also overturned trucks. High waves and rafting ice caused severe marine conditions. A 2 meter seiche with rafting ice was reported along the eastern shoreline of Lake Erie which temporarily reduced the flow of Niagara Falls to only 0.5%. At least two freighters (The "Labradoc" and the "Canadian Mariner") required joint Canadian-US Coast Guard rescues. There was widespread damage across southern and central Ontario including glass panes being blown out of office buildings in downtown Toronto, damaged roofs, downed trees, and widespread power outages. The storm also produced a tornado at 9:30pm (local) 5km north of Leamington.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: 13
Place: Southern Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: April 4, 1979 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Southern Ontario was affected by 3 consecutive storms between April 4th and April 8th. The first storm moved through on April 4th bringing heavy, wet snow to the region including 12 cm in Toronto. On April 5th, an intense low pressure system moved into Ontario from the Northwest Territories and tracked over the northern Great Lakes. This system produced a tornado near Leamington on the 5th, created 110 km/hr winds throughout southern Ontario including 128 km/hr winds recorded in Trenton, and 25cm of snow in the eastern Lake Superior region. As a result of this second storm, there were widespread power outages, vehicle accidents including a 60 car pile-up on Highway 400 north of Toronto as well as extensive property damage. Effects were not only limited to land. A 2m seiche as well as 5 m waves were reported on Lake Erie which caused a lake freighter to list and its crew of 20 to be evacuated. Ice jams also cause the flow over Niagara Falls to be reduced by 95%. On the 8th, a third storm moved in from the U.S. Midwest. This system brought freezing rain (e.g. 13 mm reported in London) and heavy snow (e.g.43.9 cm of snow in Hamilton). Over the 5 day period, 13 weather-related deaths were reported.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southwestern Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: March 5, 1979 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Southwestern Ontario, March 5, 1979. The Thames, Saugeen and Grand Rivers were some of the rivers that overflowed and caused flooding in March, 1979. Many roads were closed along the Thames River, and on the Grand River several businesses were closed; some communities on the Thames, Saugeen and Grand Rivers experienced disrupted utility service.
Event Type: Hazardous Chemicals | Leak / Spill Release Fatalities: Unknown
Place: North York ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: February 21, 1979 Evacuated: 5000
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments North York ON, February 21, 1979. The North York Gasoline Leak occurred on the morning of February 21, 1979 at Imperial Oil. The gasoline had escaped from a separator and gone into the sewer system underneath the industrial area bounded by Finch and Sheppard on the north and south and by Keele and Dufferin on the west and east. Estimates of the gasoline that eventually flowed into Dufferin Creek vary between 800 and 2,000 gallons.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Cold Event Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Yukon to Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: February 8, 1979 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Yukon to Ontario, February 8-20, 1979. Weather slowed TransCanada and Alaska oil flow to one fourth its normal flow, causing furnaces to break down from lack of oil; pipes burst across Metro Toronto; Feb. 20, 1979 the first time in recorded history, all five Great Lakes froze over, ceasing all water traffic; a snowstorm in Iqaluit, Northwest Territories caused temperatures to reach -40°C, winds as high as 100 km/h, and snow kept residents indoors for 10 days.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: 8
Place: Southwestern Ontario Injured / Infected: 400
Event Date: January 26, 1978 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Southwestern Ontario, January 26, 1978. 32 cm of snow in 36 hours. Heavy snow and high winds (>115 km/hr), extensive damage done; 400 injuries.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Drought Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Central Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 1, 1978 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Central Ontario, 1978. Extensive central Ontario drought; heat and drought stress resulted in low crop yields in Ontario.
Event Type: Fire | Non-Residential Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Cobalt, Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 23, 1977 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments On May 23rd, a fire broke near Rowden's Hardware store in Cobalt, ON. The fire quickly spread and over 100 volunteer firefighters from surrounding communities helped in the fire suppression efforts. In the end, the fire destroyed 140 buildings and left 459 individuals homeless. The estimated losses were $4 million (1977 CAD). Many residents did not rebuild in Cobalt; between the 1971 and 1981 Census, the population of Cobalt dropped by almost 20%.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southern and Central Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: March 13, 1977 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Southern and central Ontario, March 13, 1977. Areas along the Saugeen and Maitland Rivers in southwestern Ontario and the city of Sault Ste. Marie that experienced flooding. Many roads were closed along the Saugeen and Maitland Rivers.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Niagara Peninsula ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 28, 1977 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Niagara Peninsula ON, January 28, 1977. The storm lasted 3 days and left 2000 people stranded by the end of the first day. 3,000 vehicles were left abandoned and had to be dug out and towed away. All cities experienced freezing of individual lines. St. Catharines reported 300 service calls during that weekend. Ontario Hydro had two major breaks in electrical power.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Toronto ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: August 27, 1976 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Toronto ON, August 27, 1976. At least five roads were closed due to flooding.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Vehicle Fatalities: 10
Place: Toronto, Ontario Injured / Infected: 20
Event Date: December 12, 1975 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments On December 12th, at a level-crossing on St. Clair Avenue E. and the GO train crossing, a malfunction on a TTC bus left it stranded on the tracks. As the GO Train approached the crossing and the bus unable to move, panic-stricken bus passengers attempted to exit the bus as quickly as possible. Sadly, there was not enough time to evacuate the entire bus before it was struck by the GO Train; 10 bus passengers were killed and another 20 were injured. This was considered to be the worst transit disaster in Toronto's history.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: 29
Place: Lake Superior ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: November 10, 1975 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Lake Superior ON, November 10, 1975. The entire crew of 29 died: the 218-metre ore carrier "Edmund Fitzgerald" sailing out of Sault Ste. Marie sank during a gale in 156 metres of water.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Cambridge/Waterloo Region ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: May 17, 1974 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Grand River, Cambridge ON, May 17-21, 1974. Many roads and businesses were closed in Cambridge; some small dams (one on the Grand River and two on the Maitland River) were damaged and utility services were disrupted in some areas.
Event Type: Civil Incident | Disturbance / Demonstrations Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Toronto, Ontario Injured / Infected: 56
Event Date: April 7, 1974 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments On April 7th, a meeting in support of native rule in Portugal's African territories at the University of Toronto was interrupted when an opposing group shattered glass doors and overturned tables. The meeting was attended by roughly 250 people where 56 were injured.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: 9
Place: Windsor ON Injured / Infected: 30
Event Date: April 3, 1974 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Windsor ON, April 3, 1974. 9 dead, 30 injured.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: 12
Place: Barrie ON Injured / Infected: 43
Event Date: March 18, 1973 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Barrie ON, March 18, 1973. A bus-truck collision on Hwy 400 caused 12 deaths and 43 blizzard-related injuries.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Lake Huron ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: March 1, 1973 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Lake Huron ON, March 1973. The southern coast of Lake Huron from Sarnia to Bayfield was hit by major storms in the months of March and April; heavy damage was reported.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Drought Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 1, 1973 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Ontario, 1973. Heat and drought stress resulted in low crop yields; record warm summer and local drought hurt potato and apple production.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storm Surge Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Great Lakes Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: November 14, 1972 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments On November 14th, a nor'easter moved into the Great Lakes region and impacted Lake Erie, Lake St. Clair and Lake Huron in particular. In 1972, Lake Erie was already at record high levels. During the storm, water gages registered a 2.4 m (8 ft) difference in water level between Buffalo, NY and Toledo, Ohio. This event led to significant property damage along the shoreline; an estimated $22 million (USD 1973).
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Geomagnetic Storm Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Across Canada Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: August 4, 1972 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments On August 4th, a moderately severe geomagnetic storm caused disruptions in communication and power services throughout Canada and the United States. In Canada, power disturbances were noted at the Newfoundland and Labrador Power Commission, Hydro-Quebec, Ontario Hydro, and Manitoba Hydro.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: 6
Place: Sudbury, Lively, Coppercliff and Field ON Injured / Infected: 200
Event Date: August 20, 1970 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: $75,000
Comments Sudbury, Lively, Coppercliff and Field ON, August 20, 1970. An F3 tornado (wind speeds of 252-330 km/h) caused the loss of six lives, 200 injuries, and extensive damage to property.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Air Fatalities: 109
Place: Toronto ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: July 5, 1970 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Pearson International Airport (then called Malton Airport), Toronto ON, July 5, 1970. 109 dead (all aboard): a DC-8 lost one starboard engine during a landing attempt: on the second attempt, the second starboard engine fell off and the plane crashed.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Central Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: June 27, 1970 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Central Ontario, June 27-28, 1970. Areas along the Spanish, Wanapetei, Blind, Little White, Goulais and Mississagi Rivers, as well as the city of Sault Ste. Marie experienced flooding; several businesses and roads were closed due to the flooding. Most of the damages were reported in Sault Ste. Marie and on the Spanish, Wanapetei and Blind Rivers.
Event Type: Explosion | Non-Residential Fatalities: 1
Place: Malton, Ontario Injured / Infected: 22
Event Date: October 25, 1969 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments In the afternoon of October 25th, a faulty gas line exploded near the intersection of Airport and Derry Roads (the Four Corners) in Malton, ON. Nine businesses were destroyed; many were never rebuilt. Several families also lost their homes in addition to hundreds who were evacuated. The fire killed 1 resident, and injured 22 others.
Event Type: Fire | Residential Fatalities: 13
Place: Dunnville ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 1, 1969 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Dunnville ON, 1969. Victoria Hotel Fire; 13 dead.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Storms and Severe Thunderstorms Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Lambeth ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: August 19, 1968 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Lambeth ON, August 19, 1968. A severe hailstorm caused extensive crop and property damage and left ice up to 17.5 cm deep on streets.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Flood Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southwestern and Southern Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: February 2, 1968 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Southwestern and Southern Ontario, February 2, 1968. Areas around Kettle Creek, the Thames and Ausable Rivers, the St. Clair and Niagara regions and the cities of Bayfield and Toronto experienced some flooding in February 1968.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Winter Storm Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Southern Ontario Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 13, 1968 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Southern Ontario, January 13, 1968. Experienced 3 days of freezing rain and wet snow in Jan. 1968; the storm caused widespread power failures, school closures, cancellation of food deliveries, disruption of mail and fire services, the collapse of several buildings and antennae, isolation of hospitals, and highway blockings.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Tornado Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Huron and Perth counties ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: April 17, 1967 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Huron/Perth counties ON, April 17, 1967.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Vehicle Fatalities: 8
Place: Windsor, Ontario Injured / Infected: 16
Event Date: December 21, 1966 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments In the early afternoon of December 21st, a 35-tonne dump truck carrying a load of sand overturned at an intersection onto a school bus full of children near Oldcastle, ON, (within the City of Windsor). Tragically, 8 children between the ages of 6 and 9 lost their lives, a further 16 others were sustained injuries. At the time, this was considered the worst traffic accident in Windsor-area history.
Event Type: Infrastructure failure | Transportation Fatalities: 9
Place: Ottawa ON Injured / Infected: 57
Event Date: January 1, 1966 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Ottawa ON, August 1966. One hour before quitting time, the Heron road bridge that was under construction collapsed. It was the worst construction accident up to that time in Ottawa's history resulting in 9 deaths and 57 people injured. Police, construction workers, and ordinary citizens helped in the rescue of the survivors. After this incident, the Ontario Safety Code was amended.
Event Type: Transportation accident | Marine Fatalities: 28
Place: Lake Huron ON Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 1, 1966 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Lake Huron ON, 1966. Sinking of the ore carrier \"D.J. Morrell\": 28 dead.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Drought Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 1, 1965 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick, 1965.
Event Type: Meteorological - Hydrological | Drought Fatalities: Unknown
Place: Ontario and Quebec Injured / Infected: Unknown
Event Date: January 1, 1964 Evacuated: Unknown
Estimated Total Cost: Unknown
Comments Ontario and Quebec, 1964.